In Lieu of Beer, Brussels Sprouts

Two east coast visitors in two days makes Megan a happy girl. Jeb, my charming and hilarious friend from Boston College, stopped in for a night on Sunday and fabulous Anthony has graced San Fransciso with his presence for the next few days. On Sunday we took Jeb up to Sonoma, ate at The Girl & the Fig, drove to Yountville and had macarons and espresso out on the patio of Bouchon Bakery, and chatted away until it was dark and my flip-flopped feet were freezing. Then tonight, Linnea and I were supposed to meet up with Anthony and Liz to have some drinks in the city. Blame it on daylight savings time (because I am) or my minor social anxiety (likely) or just pure laziness (very likely)–but I’m sitting here in front of my computer screen instead of on a bar stool.

I actually took a shower, got dressed, put on a little blush (generally the extent of my make-up) and was ready to roll. I was in the passenger side of Linnea’s car, deciding which playlist to listen to. For a few blocks, there were lots of internal pep-talks about how much fun this would be and how productive Tuesdays were over-rated anyhow. Nope, turn the car around. I just couldn’t imagine staying out late, having to get up early, and navigating around noisy bars. Instead, I turned to brussels sprouts, chorizo, and onion and tried a recipe I’m thinking of making for Thanksgiving. While I’m dying to see Anthony and hear about what’s going on in his world, I was thrilled with a hot plate of these little guys with dinner. I know that brussels sprouts aren’t everyone’s favorite, but these are quite tender and absorb the flavor of the chorizo and onion beautifully. I’d go out on a limb and say that even non sprout-loving folks may appreciate them.

Brussels Sprouts with Chorizo

Brussels Sprouts with Chorizo

  • Yield: 4
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 30 mins
  • Total time: 45 mins

From: Food and Wine Magazine

Ingredients

1 lb. Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved, lengthwise
2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
6 oz. cured Spanish chorizo, quartered lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1/4" slices
1/2 small yellow onion, roughly chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions

Heat a 6-qt. pot of salted water to a boil. Add the Brussels sprouts and cook until just tender, 6 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer Brussels sprouts to a bowl of ice water; let sit for 5 minutes. Drain Brussels sprouts and pat dry with paper towels; set aside.

Heat 1 tbsp. of the oil in a 12″ cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chorizo and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned, about 5 minutes. Add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown and soft, about 8 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until soft, about 2 more minutes. Transfer chorizo mixture to a bowl. Increase heat to high and add the remaining oil and reserved Brussels sprouts; cook flipping once or twice, until the Brussels sprouts are browned and tender, about 8 minutes. Stir in the reserved chorizo mixture and season with salt and pepper.

Comments

  1. Mo

    Love this Megan! The photos are amazing. I've had a hankering for brussles sprouts myself... heading to Bottega in Yountville this Saturday for lunch to give Michael Chiarello's version a try so I can copy it (I hear his are amazing). Come join if you like!

  2. Megan Gordon

    Oooh, I'd love to join you at Bottega! I'm having brunch with an old high school friend on Saturday in the city, but I'd love to hear how it was (will you post about it?).

  3. El

    Would you believe I've never tried these? I'll definitely have to give this recipe a try.

  4. kiss my spatula

    stunning photos! you have a gorgeous blog here, not to mention, i love brussel sprouts and chorizo. never have had them together, but now i will definitely be giving it a try!

  5. Katerina

    I love Brussels, but as you say not everyone does. I have found adding bacon helps them be appreciated but chorizo would be a great idea. Your pictures are lovely.

  6. Anonymous

    What a brilliant idea!

  7. Megan Gordon

    El: now is the time! This recipe is a good first step :)

    Katerina and "Kiss My Spatula": thank you for the picture compliments. And yes, I'm thinking bacon and brussels for Thanksgiving!

  8. Mardi @eatlivetravelwrite

    The Girl and the Fig and Bouchon (Bakery) are definitely on our list for next summer's jaunt to California....

  9. abraham

    sprouts is something i like. and this seems to me a good recipe, will surely try. ur photos are excellent.
    rgds
    abraham chacko

  10. Justin

    this looks good to me... i've made brussels sprouts with bacon, but the chorizo is a totally cool spin.

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