Blueberry Ripple Yogurt Pops

Blueberry Ripple Yogurt Pops | A Sweet SpoonfulIn a few short weeks, we’re headed to New York, Vermont and New Jersey to visit family and see my sister Zoe get married. In starting to think through the trip and do a little planning, I found Oliver the cutest tiny-person dress shoes I’ve ever seen (and he’s quite smitten with them), sussed out childcare options for the night of the wedding, and found what feels like the most expensive (and last) rental car in the state of New Jersey. I try very hard not to be one of Those People that begins lamenting the loss of a season before it’s remotely appropriate to do so, but this year, as we’ll be gone much of September, I’ve felt a bit of a ‘hurry, make all the summery things!’ feeling set in. So we’ve been managing increasingly busy days punctuated with zucchini noodle salads, gazpacho, corn on the cob and homemade popsicles (preferably eaten shirtless outside followed by a good, solid sprinkler run for one small person in particular. Not naming any names).

Blueberry Ripple Yogurt Popsicles | A Sweet SpoonfulA few weeks back we went blueberry picking with our friends John and Emily and their son, Lewis (Oliver’s best friend). While we love Bow Hill Blueberries, it was a bit of a trek this year with the little guys, so we checked out Bybee Farms instead, right at the base of Mount Si. We loaded up the car early, got a strong latte on the way out of town and pulled up just as the hot (hot, hot) sun was starting to peek out from behind the mountain. Blueberry Ripple Yogurt Popsicles | A Sweet Spoonful

The boys spent much of their time picking and almost immediately eating their blueberries, so we didn’t win any awards for Most Blueberries Picked, 2017. No medals, no crowns, but we did leave with almost 3 pounds and spent the weekend snacking on handfuls and sprinkling them on morning cereal. I ended up freezing a few cups, thinking I’d make a crisp or cobbler. Maybe some muffins.

Blueberry Ripple Yogurt Pops | A Sweet SpoonfulBut then, the ‘hurry, make all the summery things!’ feeling moved into the house and I was lying in bed drinking coconut Le Croix and reading A Year Between Friends by Maria Alexandra Vettese and Stephanie Congdon Barnes, and stumbled across their Raspberry Ripple pops. It was a sign: 10:30 pm popsicles were in order.

If you’re not familiar with A Year Between Friends, it’s by the women who started 3191 Miles Apart, a website devoted to chronicling a friendship, mostly in photographs, from two homes across the country (Portland, OR and Portland, ME).  A few times a week they each post a photo and a few words, encapsulating their day. It’s often something domestic and, perhaps, some would say insignificant but the simple moments all add up to tell the story of their lives, family, and their own friendship with one another. I’ve kept the book on my nightstand for a few months now, and dip into it as an escape and for a little inspiration surge: there are craft projects (naturally dyed baby clothes!), recipes, letters and stories — tales of family passing away, sugar cookies baked, babies born. Lives getting lived.

Blueberry Ripple Yogurt Pops

Blueberry Ripple Yogurt Pops

  • Yield: approximately 8 pops
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Inactive time: 4 hrs
  • Total time: 4 hrs 15 mins

Maria and Stephanie wrote this recipe for raspberry pops, but I was specifically looking for something to do with our blueberries – so there you have it. But feel free to use any summer berry you like. I ended up straying from instructions a bit and cooking down the berries with sugar and lemon juice to make the mixture a bit jammier before throwing it into the food processor; this is nice, too, because it allows you to use frozen berries instead (or along with) fresh, so these can be a season-less affair. 

Adapted from: A Year Between Friends 

Ingredients

3 cups fresh blueberries (or frozen, note differing instructions below)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
5 tablespoons (65g) sugar
1 1/2 cups (360ml) plain whole-milk yogurt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
popsicle sticks

Instructions

In a small heavy-bottomed saucepan, cook down the blueberries, lemon juice and 2 tablespoons of sugar for 2-3 minutes, or until berries soften and become a little jammy bit and sugar is dissolved (if using frozen berries, this will take longer). Let cool, off the heat, for 10 minutes. 

In a blender or food processor, blend the berry mixture until liquified. 

In a small mixing bowl, whisk together yogurt, remaining 3 tablespoons (40g) sugar, and vanilla extract. 

Dividing evenly, layer the blueberry puree and vanilla yogurt in the pop molds until they’re nearly filled (leave 1/4-1/2 inch at the top for expansion). To create the swirls, gently poke each pop with the end of a chopstick before placing the lid on the mold and adding the popsicle sticks. 

Freeze until firm, at least 4 hours. To remove the pops, run warm water over the outside of the molds and slide them out. Store in the freezer in an airtight container between layers of parchment or wax paper. 

Comments

  1. Lori

    Megan, Oliver is so beautiful! And these pops look super delish. I really love reading your stories and keeping up with your life. Have a great rest of your summer, Lori

    1. megang

      Thank you, Lori! You're too sweet. Hope your summer is wrapping up nicely, too :)

  2. Julie

    Lovely. If you are in the Princeton/New Brunswick area in the next month, Terhune Orchards has good raspberry picking in September--it's a bit commercial, but the fruit is wonderful! Enjoy the end of the season/beginning of the next.

    1. megang

      Thank you for the tip, Julie! We looked up the orchard and it looks great - about a 40 minute drive from where we'll be, but I think we're going to try to bring the whole crew. Thanks so much for the tip!

  3. Mary

    These look delicious! Oliver's little curly q's around his ears are SO SWEET! What a handsome little guy. :o)

    1. megang

      Thank you, Mary! We waited so long for that hair to grown! I can't get enough of it now :)

  4. Lisa

    Leave on baby watch tomorrow. Supposed to be 100! These will be welcome. Bringing the recipe!

    1. megang

      YES!!!!!

  5. Vicky

    These look amazing! In Australia we're just now coming out of Winter, and I'm getting so impatient for the warmer weather to set in. Can't wait for new season blueberries! Also, chubby baby hands holding ice pops in a fist has got to be most adorable thing on Earth!!

    1. megang

      Awww, thanks Vicky! I hope you enjoy them (and get a chance to make them soon!)

  6. Carla

    Thanks for recommending that book! Got it from the library and read it all in one evening:) loved it!

    1. megang

      Yay! So glad!!

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