Whole-Grain Cherry Almond Crisp

20130620_AttuneCherryCrisp-115

Yesterday I looked up and realized we’re into the last half of July. Already. And I had one of those inevitable panics where I feel like we haven’t been hiking enough, we haven’t done any camping or road-tripping or picnicking. Sam and I used to devote Sunday mornings to visiting one of our favorite bakeries and reading the paper — and then moseying into Ballard to shop at the farmers market. But now that I bake all day on Sundays for Marge, that tradition has slipped by the wayside. And I feel the same thing happening with the season this year. While I honestly wouldn’t want to be anywhere other than Seattle, our summer can feel pretty short (it really doesn’t get going until the beginning of July). And on those gray, dark February days, I want to make sure I’ve gotten in some good hiking, camping and picnicking. This whole grain skillet crisp is a good place to start: while we didn’t take it out picnicking, I did take it out into the backyard and had a very generous slice right out of the skillet. Slowly. At 9:30 p.m. when it was still light out. So really, when you consider those moments, July could be worse.

I’m not sure if I’ve formally shared with you all yet, but I’ll be working with Attune Foods for a handful of months developing original recipes using their incredible line of whole grain cereals and graham crackers. I feel very lucky as they’re all products that I truly believe in and use often in the house. This recipe is made with their classic Uncle Sam cereal which I love because it’s not at all too sweet  (less than 1g of sugar!) but packs a whallop of protein and fiber. The ingredient list contains a total of four ingredients — you don’t see that much these days. When we’re not sprinkling Marge Granola on yogurt, Uncle Sam has become a staple around here.

As for the crisp: it’s a quick, juicy mess of summer all nestled in a cast-iron skillet. If you’ve tried some of the whole grain, seasonal recipes on this site you’re going to like it. It relies solely on whole wheat flour and almond meal — with a splash of buttermilk and a handful of sliced almonds. The topping straddles the line between a crisp and a cobbler (it’s a touch biscuity) and I’ve used it atop a layer of blueberries and blackberries, too. The result? It was a close competitor to the version below. In that way, I say use any berries you like if you can’t get your hands on summer cherries, and let me know if you try other fruits as well — I’d love to hear about it. Until then, a recipe and a promise to be back here soon — with a summer picnic under my belt. I wish all the same for you. Late July: let’s do this.

Whole Grain Cherry Almond Crisp

Whole Grain Cherry Almond Crisp

  • Yield: Serves 6
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 30 mins
  • Total time: 45 mins

Ingredients

For the filling:

1 3/4 pounds cherries, stemmed and pitted (about 6 cups)
3 tablespoons natural cane sugar
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 teaspoons cornstarch
*For the topping:
1/2 cup / 60 grams whole-wheat flour
3 tablespoons light brown sugar
1/2 cup / 50 grams almond meal
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
6 tablespoons / 85 grams cold unsalted butter, cut into ½ -inch pieces, plus more to grease pan
1/4 cup 60 milliliters buttermilk
3/4 cup / 60 grams bran cereal
1/2 cup / 40 grams sliced almonds

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375 F. Generously butter a 10-inch cast-iron skillet or other oven-safe pan.

Make the crisp topping
In the bowl of a food processor, combine the whole wheat flour, brown sugar, almond meal, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and kosher salt and pulse a few times to combine. Add the butter. Pulse 20-30 seconds, or until the mixture resembles coarse cornmeal. Slowly add the buttermilk and continue pulsing until the liquid is incorporated. At this point, the dough should come in clumps.

Turn the topping out into a medium bowl and fold in the Uncle Sam cereal and almonds; mix with a wooden spoon (or your hands) until both are incorporated.


Prepare the filling
Toss together the cherries, sugar, lemon juice, vanilla extract and cornstarch in a medium mixing bowl. Transfer to the prepared cast iron skillet or other baking-safe pan.

Spoon the topping over the cherries by the heaping tablespoon, so they’re almost fully covered (it’s okay if some around the edges are peeking through). Place in the oven and bake for about 30 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through to ensure even baking. The top should be golden brown and the cherry juices bubbling through.

Remove from the oven, and cool for at least 20 minutes before serving. Serve warm or room temperature. Wrapped in plastic wrap, the crisp will keep at room temperature for 1 additional day.

Comments

  1. sally

    Looks delicious! I love cherries in the summer. Thanks for sharing!

  2. Vanessa Burgess

    I think you should bake for Marge on Mondays and return to your Sunday morning traditions!
    I think I will try this with a jar of tart cherries from Zabars.

    1. megang

      Hi Aunt V- I agree re: Sunday traditions. I miss them! One thing: I don't think this recipe will work well with the jar of cherries. The moisture content is going to differ from fresh. You could definitely use frozen if you want but I think jarred cherries are going to be mushy, mushy. Hope you're doing well! xox

  3. Suzanne Toaspern-Holm

    Uncle Sam Cereal, that is a trip down memory lane. Don & I used to eat that when we were first married. I will get a box and try your recipe with peaches. The last crisp I made was whole grain with some almond flour, but it wasn't quite right. I am eager to try your recipe. (I get almond flour at Trader Joe's.) Take care.

    1. megang

      Hi Suzanne - I should've guessed that you would've been an Uncle Sam Cereal fan :) It's good stuff .. welcome change from all the sweet stuff on the store shelves these days. Love to hear how the recipe goes with peaches. Happy summer to you and Don + family. xox, Megan

  4. Joni

    Looks incredible! We have soooo many cherries, thanks for the idea.

  5. merry jennifer

    Ah, summer. It's passing too quickly here, too. I just realized today that my kids go back to school in just a few weeks. Why is it that summer seems endless when it's June, and just a month later, fall seems to be peeking around the corner?

    I love crisps. Love. And cherries? Heavenly.

  6. Mallory

    This looks awesome, I love cherries! Too bad cherry season is drawing to a close. But I guess there's always other summer fruits you could substitute in.

  7. Jamie

    I completely understand - the summer feels like it is over. With 3 kids in the house, our oldest about to start Kindergarten, I feel like - where did it all go ? And summer is the time that I do the least cooking - we are always out and about and doing things (aka - experiencing life). Now it is time to hunker down a bit and do some more cooking, get everybody ready for the seasons to come. Thanks for your kind words and fantastic recipe. Can't wait to make it this weekend.

  8. Kasey

    I couldn't agree more! I feel like summer has gotten away from me, but I'm going to try to relish these last few weeks as much as possible. Miss you! xo

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