Pork Green Chile Stew

I recently bought myself a present. I’d heard amazing things about David Tanis’s book A Platter of Figs. Cooks I respected loved it, I kept running into it at bookstores, and then I was visiting my sister in Seattle and saw it on the shelf at Delancey That’s it. I was sold. I’m not sure how to even talk about this book because it’s so unlike any other. It’s not just a cookbook. Christopher Hirsheimer takes beautiful, spare photographs that really highlight the integrity of the food. And then there’s David’s recipes. He focuses on simplicity and seasonality. In his introduction, he notes “The platter of figs is a metaphor for the food I like. Fresh ripe figs are voluptuous and generous, luxurious and fleeting. And beautiful.”

If you’re not familiar with David’s story, he grew up in Ohio, moved to California, took odd jobs in Bay Area kitchens, landed a pizza and salad gig at Chez Panisse and eventually stayed to run the upstairs cafe. The draw to open his own restaurant eventually brought him to Santa Fe. He was extremely successful there, but business became tough in a depressed economy and David moved back to CA…and to Chez Panisse. At the time, he shared the downstairs restaurant chef position with Jean-Pierre Moulle. They split up the week. Then in 2001, an opportunity arose for David to move to Paris. Initially saddened, Alice Waters came up with the perfect plan: instead of splitting up the week, they could split up the year! And that was that: David cooks for six months out of the year at Chez Panisse and during the other six months he hosts a private dining club in Paris, preparing meals in his tiny galley kitchen.

In talking about initially meeting David in the early days and asking him to cook lunch for her, Waters notes,”It was that lunch’s radical simplicity that won me over.” And that radical simplicity is exactly what drew me to A Platter of Figs. The book is split into seasonal, themed menus. For example, under Fall you’ll see “The Bean Soup Lunch” or “Dinner for a Tuscan.” David’s writing is visual and visceral: he paints lovely narratives before each menu, talking about the weather, the seasons, the light at a certain time of day. You could buy this book with little intention to cook any of the recipes and still enjoy it. I promise.

So in flipping through the book late the other night (I tend to do a lot of cookbook reading before bed), I came across this recipe for Green Chile Stew. It calls for roasting the chiles on a grill and coincidentally, it’s been almost 80 here for the past few days so I’ve been itching to break out the barbecue one last time. The recipe was inspired by David’s time in New Mexico. He describes how the stew is a staple in the Northern part of the state, with everyone making it and adhering to their own versions. It’s only time consuming in the fact that the stew must simmer for at least an hour and set for another hour, but other than that, it’s just a lot of prep and chopping. David notes that if you’d rather not use pork, feel free to use chicken, lamb, turkey, or beef. At the end of the recipe, he advises to let the stew sit for an hour or more and refrigerate overnight if desired. I’ve had it for two nights in a row and the flavors only get better. If you can, I’d make it a day ahead. I hope you’re as taken with it as I was.

Pork Green Chile Stew

Pork Green Chile Stew

  • Yield: 8-10
  • Prep time: 30 mins
  • Cook time: 30 mins
  • Total time: 1 hr

Slightly adapted from Platter of Figs

Ingredients

5 pounds well-marbled boneless pork butt
salt and pepper
2 Tablespoons vegetable oil or lard
2 large onions, finely diced
4 to 6 garlic cloves, chopped
2 teaspoons. cumin seeds, toasted and finely ground
3/4 cup chopped tomatoes, fresh or canned
6 large carrots, peeled and cubed
1 cup (or more) roasted green chiles (see Note below re: roasting)
2 Tablespoons. all-purpose flour
7 cups water or chicken broth
3 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut into large dice
chopped cilantro (garnish)

Instructions

Rub each side of the pork with salt and pepper. Cut into 2-inch cubes. Begin heating the oil or lard in a large Dutch oven or other heavy-bottomed pan. Add the meat in small batches, without crowding, and brown lightly. Transfer to a platter.

Add the onions to the pot and sautee until brown, 1-2 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, tomatoes, carrots, and green chiles, then sprinkle the flour over the mixture and stir together. Add salt to taste (start with 1/8 tsp.), then return the browned meat to the pot and stir well. Cover with the water or broth and bring to a boil. Cover the pot, turn the flame to low, and simmer gently for an hour.

Taste the broth and more salt or green chile if necessary. The broth should be well seasoned and fairly spicy. Add the potatoes and continue cooking for 30 minutes or until until they’re soft and the meat is tender. Skim any fat from surface of the broth and let stew rest for an hour or more. Refrigerate overnight if desired. To serve, reheat the stew and ladle into warmed bowls. Sprinkle with chopped cilantro and accompany with warm tortillas.

Note: Fresh green chiles (New Mexico or Anaheim) must be roasted over an open flame on a barbecue grill, gas burned or under the broiler till blackened. Then rub off the skins, remove the stems and seeds, and coarsely chop the chiles. Twelve large fresh chiles will yield about 1 cup of chopped. Lacking these, a pretty fair approximation can be made with a combination of fresh poblanos and roasted jalapenos. Frozen green chiles are an acceptable substitute for fresh; use canned chiles only as a last resort.

Comments

  1. Chez Danisse

    This book is on my list. It looks wonderful and your description confirms all that I've heard and read. So many books...so little time. I've been looking back at my The Art of Simple Food before bed lately.

  2. Karine

    You chili sounds delicious! Thanks for sharing :)

  3. Sean

    I lived in Santa Fe for a while, and have been craving New Mexican food for a while now. This sends me back there. Must try!

  4. Megan Gordon

    Oh, Mardi! I need you in my corner on a daily basis :) Not quite rocking the DSLR yet, I'm afraid...And Denise, it's so funny because I've been thinking a lot about The Art of Simple Food and how I must ask Santa for it this year.

    And thank you Karine and Sean: it is delicious and quite simple. Enjoy!

  5. Nicole

    Forgive me for commenting on such an old post but I just love this bowl. Any idea where you got it?

    1. megang

      Hi Nicole! Yes, I got it at Crate & Barrel about a year ago and I believe they still have them. Good luck!

  6. Gonzalez

    True New Mexican born and raised!!! I have seen and had a variety of green chili stews but I have never seen one with carrots! Yum cannot wait to make this for dinner tonight !! My kids will LOVE this thank you 🙏
    New Mexico - Gonzo family.

    1. megang

      Yay! I hope you guys loved it!

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