Dairy-Free Coconut Walnut Fudge

Well here we are: what will presumably be the last post of 2018. Any second we’ll start seeing all the “Top 9” posts on Instagram along with friend’s musings as they look back on 2018 and look forward to what they hope to accomplish next year. As with all social media, I can’t help but think that a tiny bit of this is performance or posturing for others, no? We have a few clear goals or intentions for the year ahead and then maybe we throw in a few that just sound good — even to ourselves — although we may know deep down we’re not going to run a triathlon or take up watercolor painting. It could happen though, right? Dairy Free Coconut Walnut Fudge | A Sweet SpoonfulI did something radical last year and was brutally honest with myself and what I really wanted for the year ahead. Sam and I always sit down and make lists of our goals and intentions on New Years Day (typically over biscuits and collard greens at The Wandering Goose), and this year my list was incredibly small: I mentioned nothing about my career (although I was very fortunate to stumble upon the perfect job), new hobbies, or travels. Instead, I asked myself, if no one else mattered and I wasn’t trying to round out some list that felt balanced and creative and entrepreneurial, what did I honestly want deep down for myself in 2018? And for me the answer was to get pregnant again with a second baby. 

We’d already been trying for a number of months at that point, but in looking at the arch of the upcoming year, that was my biggest hope. My friend Julie encouraged me to work at it like you would anything else: I made dietary changes, tried to meditate, took supplements. It wasn’t something that came immediately or magically for us by any means, but it felt good to put some real intention behind it.

So maybe during this time, as you think about the past year and the one ahead, you can take a cue from my friend Julie and be brutally honest with yourself. Don’t feel like you have to apologize for your goal or intention or even explain it if you don’t want to. Don’t feel like you have to make an entire, exhaustive list. Just get it out there. Write it down and tuck it away somewhere safe. Eat some fudge. Talk about it if you want. Envision it. Carry on.

_________________________________________________________________

A note on yearly intentions: I was hesitant in a way to publish this post as I know many of you struggle with fertility issues, or, simply the idea of starting or growing a family is loaded for a number of reasons. I didn’t want the post to feel like a neat, tidy ending — as though if you put your mind to something and just wait it’ll come true! That’s, sadly, just not how life works out all of the time. But rather, I hoped to communicate that sometimes it’s really, really nice to clear away all the noise (I’m looking at you, triathlons) and others’ expectations and hopes for yourself, and get really honest about just one thing you want and hope for in the coming year.

A note on this fudge: So I decided to make vegan fudge. None of us are vegan in this house, but I really love coconut milk and was just curious if I could make a less stressful fudge (i.e. no candy thermometer) that would work using a non-dairy milk. It worked! It’s velvetty and thanks to the two kinds of chocolate, has a really nice balanced flavor. The one thing I’d like to say is that it’s soft; this isn’t the fudge you want to put in your gifting cookie tins (unless you tell the recipient to refrigerate it). It really belongs in the refrigerator until you’re ready to serve, takes a touch of patience getting it off the parchment paper, and takes an overnight chill to firm up. But man is it worth it.

Dairy-Free Coconut Walnut Fudge

Dairy-Free Coconut Walnut Fudge

  • Yield: 36 small pieces
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 5 mins
  • Inactive time: 8 hrs
  • Total time: 8 hrs 20 mins

This dairy-free fudge doesn’t require a candy thermometer or much fuss and rivals its more traditional counterpart in the flavor department. It’s super adaptable, so feel free to mix in your favorite nuts, dried fruits or seeds. The one thing to know before starting out is that the fudge needs to chill for at least 8 hours, so it’s a good recipe to make the day before you actually plan on serving it. Obviously if you’d like this fudge to be completely vegan, be sure you’re using a vegan chocolate and choose an alternate sweetener like agave.

Ingredients

1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut flakes, divided
1 (13.5-ounce) can full-fat coconut milk
3 tablespoons honey
3 tablespoons coconut oil
12 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped (or use chips)
12 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped (or use chips)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup Heirloom Diamond walnuts, chopped

Instructions

Toast the coconut: In a large, dry, hot saucepan, add the coconut and toast over low heat, stirring occasionally to encourage even toasting, for about 3 minutes or until fragrant and golden brown. Remove coconut from pan immediately and spread onto a clean plate.

Make the fudge: Line an 8×8-inch baking dish with parchment paper and set aside.

Place coconut milk, honey and coconut oil in a medium saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Reduce the heat to low and stir in the chocolate until just melted and combined. Stir in the vanilla extract and remove from heat.

Transfer chocolate mixture to the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and mix on medium-high speed for 2 minutes. Fold in the walnuts and 1/2 of the toasted coconut.

Pour into the prepared baking dish and sprinkle with remaining toasted coconut. Refrigerate until firm, at least 8 hours or overnight. Slice into small squares, and keep refrigerated until ready to serve.

Store the fudge, tightly wrapped in plastic, in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks or in the freezer for 3 months.

Comments

  1. Louise Crosby

    I made this fudge and it's fantastic, a keeper. I love that it only has 3 tablespoons of sweetener and that the sweetener is honey. I will increase the amount of walnuts to 2 cups next time because I LOVE nuts. Thanks so much!

    1. megang

      So glad to hear it, Louise! I loved it, too :)

    2. megang

      So glad you enjoyed it, Louise!

  2. Pauline

    I'm also a big believer in the power of setting intentions. So happy for the exciting changes that have happened for you this year, and congratulations on your growing family. I appreciate you sharing the journey with us.

    1. megang

      Thanks so much, Pauline. I'm so glad you've enjoyed reading and checking in. Happy New Year to you!

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