A Week in China

How to sum up a week in China? In photos? In strings of words? Maybe both. I started and stopped writing this post on the eleven hour plane ride home about sixteen times. Ultimately I decided to show you some of my favorite photos, give you links to some of my favorite spots, and let you run on over to flickr to check out more of my photos if you’d like. In total, my dad and sisters and I were in Shanghai about four days and Hong Kong for two days. Too short, but we managed to pack it in. So off we go. You ready?

In short, there were crowds, humidity and smog, insomnia and early morning dumplings:

There was dragon fruit and noodles and lots of Chinese tea:

There were oddly-printed tee shirts, jade, rickshaws, fake watches, cameras, and temples:

There was coconut juice, a new obsession for bean paste sweets and local candy:

There were vistas and peaks and skylines (Hong Kong)…


…and lights. Lots and lots of glittery lights (The Bund, Shanghai):


THE WORLD EXPO, SHANGHAI:

We spent the first day at the World Expo in Shanghai. I’m embarrassed to admit I didn’t know much about the World Expo before we departed, but it’s pretty awesome. Essentially, numerous countries come together and, with one theme (this year it was green living), create an exhibit that encapsulates their country’s way of life. My favorite exhibit was the UK (you can see it above in the very center of the photo and read more about it here if you’d like). The centerpiece of their pavilion is the seed cathedral, a six story high cube-like structure made from long slim acrylic rods which draw in daylight in order to illuminate the interior (see bottom right photo). Each of those little rods had a seed at the very end (see bottom right photo)–its the largest collection of wild plant seeds in the world. It’s awe-inspiring, truly. It was worth the sweaty, pushy, cranky wait in line.

SHOPPING

In Shanghai, some of my favorite shops were: Spin Ceramics (above) for beautiful modern ceramics designed in Shanghai but created in Jing De Zhen, China’s ceramics capital. They specialize in dinnerware and decorative objects, and most pieces come in a sweet wooden box.  Urban Tribe for tastefully-chosen silver jewelry, breezy skirts and tops, black and white photography and a variety of local ceramics and teas. Nest is also great for locally-based brands showcasing eco-designed bags, papers, and housewares.  The Lomography Store is very cool for those into hipster, vintage cameras. They stock a wide variety of Holga and Diana cameras. For Chinese tea and candies, the stalls around Yuyuan Gardens are fun albeit touristy and crowded. And I.T. in the Xintiandi quarter is great for interesting, cutting edge fashion.

Sweet decor at Urban Tribe

In Hong Kong, we visited Lane Crawford, the infamous Chinese department store that’s been around since 185o. Today, it’s pretty high end, but it’s a must-see for historic value, if nothing else. We also popped into many of the shops and galleries along Taikang Road (see “Neighborhoods” below), and bought sweet little jade necklaces on “Jade Row,” specifically at Che Fai Jades Company which came recommended to us.

NEIGHBORHOODS
In Shanghai in particular, there are interesting, distinct neighborhoods that you really shouldn’t miss. We meandered around The French Concession with its leafy wide streets, street food, and sweet independent shops. The area itself is spread out, so bring your walking shoes and a bit of patience (or just hail a $2 cab). The Xintiandi area is where you’ll find higher end dining, more mainstream shops, and some chains you’ll recognize. It’s also where you can get an hour massage for $15 at Green Massage (book ahead-it’s busy). Also, check out Taikang Road, what was once considered the artistic underbelly of Shanghai but has now certainly caught on with the tourists. However, the tight winding streets are still charming, the shops are sweet, and there are more cafes and wine bars per square footage than I saw in any one area in China (eat lunch at Kommune. It rocks). Makes for a nice afternoon. In the evening, stroll The Bund. Have a drink at The Glamour Bar inside M on the Bund.

In Hong Kong:
Because we were only in Hong Kong for two days, we packed in the tourist sights much more than we meandered neighborhoods. That being said, we got a feel for the layout of the city and what’s what. A few sights we loved:  The Peak is a bit of a drive (about 30 minutes from downtown), but offers stunning, almost panoramic views of the city. I heard it’s incredible at night. We visited the Chi Lin Nunnery and Buddhist Halls and the Lotus Gardens. As it was described to me, this isn’t a tourist attraction (and literally, there was no one there). It was recently designed as a fully functioning prayer hall and garden sanctuary. With gongs going off in the background, quiet shuffles, and cameras prohibited, there was a very special sense of calm here.


I also loved the Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple, a place where many Chinese and Japanese folks come to worship and pray for a particular wish or blessing. They light incense and place it by the temple as an offering. If their wish comes true, they return to the temple to donate a token of thanks (generally money which keeps the temple running). It’s hazy with incense smoke, it’s colorful and loud and crowded, and filled with a sense of hope and thanks and belief. That was palpable.


Then there was the best massage I’ve ever had at in the basement of the San Diego hotel. It’s serious, traditional, not for the faint of heart Chinese massage. And just for the experience, we checked out the Temple Street night market. I bought a fake Cartier watch that I kind of love and scored some young coconut juice. But those are really the only high points: it’s crowded, dirty, and seedy. But see it anyway.

FOOD
In Shanghai:
Don’t miss M on the Bund for a beautiful glittering patio overlooking the waterfront and Shanghai skyline. A special occasion spot. I fell in love with pavlova here. Kommune for lunch on the best outdoor patio in Shanghai amidst the bustling international Taikang Lu. For dumplings, Din Tai Fung has the best xaio long bao or soup dumplings in town. Ignore the rather sterile shopping mall location and dive right in. For a true taste of the local lunch scene, hit up Wang Jia Sha (805 Nanjing Road)–it’s like a locals food court with dumpling and noodle stalls and stands to take away sweet dumplings and breads.


In Hong Kong: For breakfast, you can’t beat the buffet at The Intercontinental Hotel. This is coming from someone who loathes buffets, but it’s a thing of beauty. Really. Five different kinds of honey, seven kinds of jams, a pastry bar, yogurts from around the world, fresh juices, local exotic fruits, eggs to order along with Chinese and Japanese fare. It was honestly my favorite part of our first day in Hong Kong. For lunch, Heichinrou is a solid bet for dim sum with a huge crowd of locals. Delicious shrimp dumplings, pork fried rice, and beautiful Chinese vegetables. And for my sister’s birthday, we went to Zuma; it’s certainly worthy of such an occasion. They do contemporary, family-style Japanese food and nice strong cocktails. The spicy fried tofu, dragon roll, and banana and green tea cake should not be missed. Neither should the outdoor terrace with fire pit, glowing lights, and views of downtown.


I feel so fortunate to have had the opportunity to visit Shanghai and Hong Kong. Both are truly unlike any place I’ve ever been and I’m taking little bits back home with me that will, eventually, turn into softer edged memories . As is the case with most things, I suppose. Thanks so much to those of you who sent in suggestions and recommendations–the spots I didn’t get to are on the list for the next go-around.

Comments

  1. Mardi @eatlivetravelwrite

    Megan this is one of the most beautiful blog posts I have read in a long time. A great mix of words and pictures and, like your short trip, you pack a lot into a small space. You are a gifted writer and I hope some travel magazine reads this and hires you! What a great opportunity this was and it looks like you really made the most of it!

  2. Doreen

    Truly beautiful photos and essays! And what wonderful experiences that will stay with you forever.

  3. Sanura

    This is an impressive blog post. The photos are beautiful, educational and insightful. Thank you for you sharing your experience in Hong Kong.

  4. Wizzythestick

    Wow! What a delightful place.Thanks for taking me with you with these pictures and memories of the sights and sounds:-)

  5. El

    Such a great tour and your photos cam eout great. Thanks for sharing with us!

  6. Lisa

    For someone that didn't plan, looks like you really hit some great spots!

  7. Nicky

    So nice reading about your experiences there! (And so sorry my recommendations came too late!)

  8. jennifer young

    this is so great! thanks for sharing. i just came back from china (beijing and xiamen). wish i could have spent some time in shanghai! thanks for sharing!
    j.

  9. Pop Gordon

    You captured our trip beautifully, all but the Badisson in Haun Quang (or whatever). Your writing and photography just get better and better. Glad you had a fine time and consider myself a fortunate Dad to be able to carve out some great travel time with my daughters. Pop

  10. Jessica

    This post is amazing. You did so much over such a few short days. I love the pictures and your writing encompasses your trip so well. Thanks for sharing!

  11. kamran siddiqi

    HOLY SMOKES!!

    What a wonderful trip it seems you had! The photos are absolutely gorgeous!!

  12. Danielle

    I'm with you about Din Tai Fung dumplings, they've set a standard that is truly hard to beat! Great job summarizing what sounds like a whirlwind trip. Both cities fascinate me and I can't wait to visit. And feast on dumplings for breakfast, lunch and dinner ;)

  13. Suzanne Silk

    Megan...Loved your descriptions...yummy in a variety of ways. JUST discovered your website (blog); as I'm shopping around for what to do next when it comes to blogging modalities . . . with THAT in mind I ended up on your wonderful site...WDS did you a great service.

    FYI...visit my site /http://suzannesilk.com / see how my love of the Asian aesthetic has permeated my art making; 3 visits to the Far East + counting!

    PS... I live in Lake County, CA (2.5 hrs) north of San Francisco + do hope to meet you some day, and often come into the city.

    Megan; Thanks for "showing-up"... Suzanne Silk
    Blessings, Suzanne Silk

    1. megang

      Hi Suzanne-Thanks for stopping by and saying hello. Your sight is lovely...I definitely see those influences. Congratulations!

  14. letitia

    What an amazing write-up and your pictures are gorgeous. I can't wait to visit one day too.

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