Yogurt Crepes with Berries and Yogurt Whipped Cream

Yogurt Crepes with Strawberries and Yogurt Whipped Cream | A Sweet Spoonful

For many years, I’ve always made a summer to-do list. I usually set to work on it right at the beginning of June when the days feel long and ripe with possibility. The list often involves things like learning to bake sourdough bread or making homemade ricotta, doing an epic hike I’d read about in a local magazine, training for a marathon, or reading specific novels. It is always a pretty aspirational list, and I generally don’t make much of a dent in it — resulting in the guilty feeling come late August that I’d wasted too many lazy afternoons when I could’ve been baking sourdough or making ricotta or doing memorable, epic hikes. But this summer is going to be a bit different: there will be no list. We wait so long in Seattle for long stretches of sunny days, and now that it stays late until 9:30 (or later?), I want to see more of our friends and find stretches of time to do not much of anything except catch up, tan our legs and eat farmers market berries. That’s my list.

Yogurt Crepes with Strawberries and Yogurt Whipped Cream | A Sweet Spoonful

Thankfully this crazy delicious recipe from Cheryl Sternman Rule’s beautiful new book, Yogurt Culture does not at all interfere with this summer’s non-list. It’s so simple we actually had these on a weekday, but I understand for those of you who have busier (read: bigger) households, you may want to reserve this one for the weekend. Either way, it’s summer breakfasting at its best (or desserting as these would be great in the evening, too).

I received a copy of Cheryl’s book right before we moved, so I knew I wouldn’t get a chance to cook or bake from it until we’d fully settled in. A few nights ago, it was a treat to sit on the couch as Sam was painting our window frames — trying to decide where to begin (and cheering Sam on). From sweet baking recipes to savory chicken or beef dishes, the breadth and variety of recipes in Yogurt Culture is inspiring as is Cheryl’s deep knowledge about yogurt in different cultures and applications. I find sometimes with single subject cookbooks, the star ingredient can sometimes seem forced in a particular dish, as if it doesn’t really fit but the author tries to make a case for it anyway. This is not the case with Cheryl’s book: yogurt truly takes center stage. And if you’re familiar with her witty, brilliantly written blog Five Second Rule, you know that Cheryl’s recipes always work.

Yogurt Crepes with Strawberries and Yogurt Whipped Cream | A Sweet Spoonful

If you’ve made traditional crepes in the past, you may remember pulling out your blender to ensure the batter is super smooth, and you likely recall the nice, short ingredient list. This recipe relies on yogurt instead of milk and you can use a whisk instead of your blender. It’s one of those ‘tough to mess up’ recipes as everything just goes in one bowl and you fry them up to order. I will say that much like most pancake or crepe recipes, the first one almost always turns out to be a dud, so consider that one a good taste-test candidate and don’t be discouraged right off the bat.

As for fillings or toppings, you don’t have to go the strawberry route here — we just have so many local, sweet berries in the markets right now I couldn’t help it. But really you can fill these crepes with anything you’d like — sweet or savory. Cheryl recommends ideas like bananas and nutella, fried eggs and ham, or butter and maple syrup. I think lemon curd and a little cream would be really nice, too. Or any sliced, fresh fruit (or, dare I say, ice cream for dessert!) I chose to make Cheryl’s yogurt whipped cream to go with the berries and I can already tell it’s going to be a staple around here. It has a nice tanginess that regular whipped cream doesn’t have (think cheesecake whipped cream, perhaps?) and thanks to the stability of the yogurt, you can whip it in advance and it lasts for up to 1 week in the refrigerator.

If you live in the Seattle area: I’ll be leading a discussion and Q & A with Cheryl at Booklarder next Thursday, June 25 from 6:30-8. Come with all your yogurt questions, and expect a great talk covering a variety of ways to cook and bake with this increasingly trendy (!) ingredient. I hope to see you there.

 

Yogurt Crepes with Strawberries and Yogurt Whipped Cream

Yogurt Crepes with Strawberries and Yogurt Whipped Cream

  • Yield: 9-10 Crepes
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 10 mins
  • Inactive time: 10 mins
  • Total time: 35 mins

I ended up using a bit of buckwheat flour in my crepes because I love the color and flavor, but if you’d rather use all all-purpose flour, go right ahead. The batter holds up beautifully in the fridge for a few days, so if you don’t want to cook them all off at one time, you can look forward to leftovers.

Only Slightly Adapted From: Yogurt Culture

Ingredients

For the Crepes:

4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled, plus more for the skillet
3/4 cup all purpose flour (90g)
1/4 cup buckwheat flour (30g)
1 cup plain yogurt (not Greek)
4 large eggs
About 2/3 cup whey or water
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1 pint fresh strawberries, hulled and sliced in half (or in quarters if the berries are large)

For the Yogurt Whipped Cream

1 cup cold heavy cream
1 cup plain whole milk Greek yogurt
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2-3 tablespoons sugar

Instructions

Make the whipped cream: 
Using an electric mixer with the whisk attachment, whip the cream on medium speed until soft peaks form. Add the yogurt and vanilla, then continue to whip, slowly streaming 2 tablespoons sugar down the sides of the bowl. Continue whipping until the peaks hold when the whisk is lifted. Taste, whipping in up to 1 tablespoons more sugar, if desired. Refrigerate until ready to use.

Make the Crepes:
In a large bowl, whisk the butter, flour, yogurt, eggs, whey or water, and salt until smooth. Let rest for 10 minutes. The batter should have some body but should drip easily from the whisk.

Heat a 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until a drop of water on the skillet sizzle and evaporates. Using a silicone pastry brush, brush the bottom and sides of the skillet generous with melted butter. Tilt the skillet forward, then pour 1/3 cup batter close to the lip of the skillet. Quickly swirl so the batter coats the bottom. (If the batter is too thick to swirl and coat easily, whisk 1-2 tablespoons water into the remaining batter).

Cook until the underside of the crepe is lacy and nicely browned and the edges look dry, about 1-2 minutes. Flip and cook for 1-2 minutes longer. Invert onto a plate. Brush a bit more butter onto the skillet and repeat with the remaining batter, brushing the skillet with more melted butter between batches. Stack the crepes on the plate.

To serve: top each crepe with a generous spoonful of berries and yogurt whipped cream. Enjoy immediately.

Comments

  1. Lindsey @ a honey blossom

    These crepes look great! I love stirring a little yogurt into my whipped cream to lighten it up and give it a little tang. Your half yogurt and half cream version looks like a perfect indulgent yet still balanced breakfast treat! And I'm totally with you on the buckwheat thing - it just adds something really nice to an otherwise ordinary crepe.

  2. Christina @ but i'm hungry

    I can't believe I've lived to see the day yogurt could be considered "trendy"! ;) These looks fantastic, I don't make crepes NEARLY enough!

  3. June @ How to Philosophize with Cake

    What a cool cookbook that sounds like! Yogurt has always been one of my favorite breakfast foods, so I think I'd appreciate that book. Love these crepes, they look fab :)

  4. Kathryn

    Your plans for the summer sound totally like mine - just trying to enjoy every moment without too much pressure to do 'stuff'. Love the sound of these crepes too. I've seen so many creative recipes from Cheryl's book that I really must buy a copy!

  5. Kasey

    I love your no-list list (and these crepes!). I'm thinking I need to take the same approach for the next couple of months :) xo

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