Work With Me


Founded in 2009, A Sweet Spoonful has become a destination site for whole grain baking, seasonal (mostly vegetarian) cooking, and breakfast recipes. Outside of the site, I develop recipes for online and print publications, teach culinary classes, and consult & partner with large and small companies alike. I love working with brands to help them clarify and amplify their story:

How can I help you share your story today?


Collaborations and Sponsored Posts

By partnering with A Sweet Spoonful, your brand can reach an engaged audience that is interested in cooking and baking, gatherings and parties, and building an inspired home life. I’m selective in choosing who I partner with, always looking for an authentic relationship with companies who sell products I actually like and use. In the past, I’ve worked with brands including Attune Foods, Jovial Foods, Recipe.com, Sunbasket, Albertson’s & Safeway, and Rejuvenation.

Recipe Development
Do you have a new product or ingredient you’re trying to promote? Perhaps you need a collection of recipes for your website or brand collateral? Or maybe you need help organizing or ghostwriting a cookbook? I’d love to hear more about your project and how I can help.

Copywriting and Content Creation
From high-end national online chains to local yoga studios, I love helping large companies and small businesses alike tell their stories. Whether you have a packaging project you’re working on or an entire website overhaul, engaging copy is important, and that’s what I do. Let’s talk.

Small Business Startup and Brand Consultation
I started Marge Granola in 2010 and have learned a lot along the way. Consulting with small businesses on a start-up strategy, business planning, brand identity, marketing, and food packaging is my specialty and probably one of my favorite things to do. I’d love to help you take your business to the next level.

Speaking Engagements and Events
As I have a little one at home and my days are jam-packed, I’m selective with what events and speaking engagements I say yes to, but I do love the chance to travel and talk about the work I do – whether in the food writing sphere or the natural foods sector with Marge Granola.

Partners I’ve worked with:

SweetSpoonful-PartnerLogos

Media Kit available upon request
Please reach out to megan@asweetspoonful.com

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The Thanksgiving Table

A Top Contender

A Top Contender

Today is a different kind of day. Usually posts on this blog come about with the narrative and I manage to squeeze in a recipe. But sometimes when you really stumble upon a winning recipe, it speaks for itself. We'll likely make these beans for Thanksgiving this year. They're one of those simple stunners that you initially think couldn't be much of a thing. And then they come out of the oven all sweet and withered and flecked with herbs. You try one and you realize they are, in fact, a pretty big thing. 

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Brown Butter Sweet Potato Pie with Kamut Crust

Brown Butter Sweet Potato Pie with Kamut Crust

I always force myself to wait until after Halloween to start thinking much about holiday pies or, really, future holidays in general. But this year I cheated a bit, tempted heavily by the lure of a warmly-spiced sweet potato pie that I used to make back when I baked pies for a living in the Bay Area (way back when). We seem to always have sweet potatoes around as they're one of Oliver's favorite foods, and when I roast them for his lunch I've been wishing I could turn them into a silky pie instead. So the other day I reserved part of the sweet potatoes for me. For a pie that I've made hundreds of times in the past, this time reimagined with fragrant brown butter, sweetened solely with maple syrup, and baked into a flaky kamut crust. We haven't started talking about the Thanksgiving menu yet this year, but I know one thing for sure: this sweet potato pie will make an appearance.

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Bring the Happy

Bring the Happy

It has begun. Talk of who is bringing what, where we'll buy the turkey, what kind of pies I'll make, early morning texts concerning brussels sprouts.  There's no getting around it: Thanksgiving is on its way. And with it comes the inevitable reflecting back and thinking about what we're thankful for. And about traditions. The funny thing about traditions is that they exist because they've been around for a long time. Year after year after year. But then, one Thanksgiving maybe there's something new at the table.

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For You, With Thanks

For You, With Thanks

I didn't expect green beans to bring up such a great discussion on traditions, sharing of poems and how a piece of writing can linger with you. So thank you for that. Your comments pointed out how important people and place are and how food takes the back seat when it  comes right down to it. Even if you feel quite warm towards Thanksgiving and are looking forward to next week, reading about recipe suggestions and meal planning online and in magazines can start to feel tiresome right about now. Why? Because I suppose when it all comes down to it, in the big picture it doesn't matter what we all serve anyway. Next year, you likely won't remember one year's vegetable side dish from another. What you'll remember are the markers that dotted the year for you: whom you sat next to at the table, a toast or grace, and the sense of gratitude you felt for something -- large or small.

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How to Break a Thanksgiving Tradition

How to Break a Thanksgiving Tradition

I got a text from my mom the other day that read: demerara sugar? I responded back with a question mark, not sure what she was referencing. It turns out she was experimenting with a new pie recipe that called for the natural sugar and wasn't sure why she couldn't just use white sugar as that's what she's always done in the past. A few days later we talked on the phone and she mentioned she'd let me take charge of the salad for Thanksgiving this year as long as there was no kale. No kale! And I wanted to do the mashed potatoes? Would they still be made with butter and milk? In short, we're always willing to mix things up in the Gordon household. Whether it's inspiration from a food magazine, friend or coworker, either my mom or one of my sisters will often have an idea for something new to try at the holiday table. But what I've slowly learned is that it can't really be that different: there must be pumpkin pie, the can of cranberry sauce is necessary even though not many people actually eat it, the onion casserole is non-negotiable, the salad can't be too out there, and the potatoes must be made with ample butter and milk. And while I was really scheming up an epic kale salad to make this year, there's a big part of me that gets it, too: if we change things too much we won't recognize the part of the day that comes to mean so much: the pure recognition. We take comfort in traditions because we recognize them -- because they're always there, year after year. And so today I present to you (mom, are you reading?): this year's Gordon family Thanksgiving salad.

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