Whole Wheat Skillet Biscuits with Gingered Sweet Potato Butter

Sweet Potato Skillet Biscuits with Sweet Potato Butter | A Sweet SpoonfulWriting a food blog can be a funny thing because you often feel inclined to share The Very Best ____, The Real Top Banana. But some things don’t necessarily warrant a superlative. They fall into a separate although no less worthy space. So today I’m here to tell you that these are not the best biscuits I’ve ever had. Sometimes it’s nice to have a few recipes in your back pocket that everyone likes, that require no fancy equipment (not even a rolling pin), are simple, easily dressed up, and even holiday-worthy. In this increasingly busy, harried season we’re dipping our toes into, I’m telling you: a trusty whole grain biscuit and velvety sweet potato butter beats the endless search to find The Very Best any day of the week.

Sweet Potato Skillet Biscuits with Sweet Potato Butter | A Sweet SpoonfulBiscuits are not new to this blog. I’ve made Giant Buttermilk Biscuits, Herbed Sweet Potato Drop Biscuits and Casselberry Biscuits, which really fall into a different camp altogether. But I had yet to try making biscuits with 100% whole grain flour, and have long wanted to try baking them in a cast iron skillet as I’d heard the bottoms get nice and crisp while the middle remains tender. Reporting back: true story.

Sweet Potato Skillet Biscuits with Sweet Potato Butter | A Sweet Spoonful

What I love about these is they’re just a pat out, cut and bake situation. I’d say they’re a bit sturdier than a biscuit made with all purpose flour — they have a little more heft, but they’re still perfectly tender and great with butter, your favorite jam or my new go-to: gingered sweet potato butter. I first stumbled upon the recipe for this sweet potato butter in the Toast and Jam cookbook, which has all manner of baked goods, jams and spreads (and I’d say the recipes veer towards healthier baked goods like what I often do here, so you may really like it). The author, Sarah Owens, promises that the color and flavor is akin to autumn in a jar, and she’s onto something. This stuff deserves a superlative. 

Much like the biscuits, the sweet potato butter requires little fuss (although you will have to get out your food processor). There’s no thermometer or canning involved, and you can store it in the refrigerator for up to one month. I can attest to the fact that it’s also as good stirred into plain yogurt or on top of oatmeal as it is slathered on biscuits.

Sweet Potato Skillet Biscuits with Sweet Potato Butter | A Sweet Spoonful

Maybe you’ll bake these for Thanksgiving, or maybe you’ll make them for breakfast this weekend. Maybe you’ll just bookmark them for when you finally have some downtime at home, which — given some changes at work which I’ll tell you about soon —  I’m hoping to have more of soon. Lately I’ve been particularly interested in reading and thinking about other people’s homes, desks, kitchens — how we all spend our days, especially as it relates to meals, writing, and motherhood so I thought you may enjoy a peak, too. Best, of course, with a biscuit. 

The Rooms Where Writers Work – The New York Times
What Dinner Looks Like Across the USA – Huck Magazine (via Joy the Baker)
Motherland – PBS; on the Busiest Maternity Hospital in the World
When the World Feels Awful – Design for Mankind 

Whole Wheat Skillet Biscuits with Gingered Sweet Potato Butter

Whole Wheat Skillet Biscuits with Gingered Sweet Potato Butter

  • Yield: 8 Biscuits and about 2 cups Sweet Potato Butter
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 15 mins
  • Total time: 30 mins

Sweet Potato Butter lightly adapted from: Toast and Jam

Ingredients

For the Biscuits:

2 cups (280g) whole-wheat flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
6 tablespoons unsalted cold butter, cut into small pieces
3/4 cup buttermilk, plus 2 tablespoons more if needed

For the Sweet Potato Butter: (Makes about 2 cups / 1 pint)

1 1/4 cup (320g)roasted diced sweet potatoes, skins removed
1/2 cup (55g) peeled, cored and cubed apples
1/3 cup (70g) grapefruit juice
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/3 cup sorghum syrup
1 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

Instructions

Make the Biscuits:
Preheat the oven to 450 F. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt and baking soda. Add the butter and toss to coat. Either using a pastry blender or your fingertips, work the butter into the dry ingredients (with your fingers, pinch the butter into the flour repeatedly until the mixture resembles large crumbs; it’s ok if some of the mixture is as large as small peas – it doesn’t all have to be uniform). Stir in the buttermilk and mix with a fork until the dough gathers together. If you need a little extra buttermilk, add it 1 tablespoon at a time.

Scrape the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and pat it into a 1 1/2 inch-thick round. Using a 2 1/2-inch round biscuit or cookie cutter, cut into rounds (dip the cutter in flour in between to avoid sticking). If you’ve got biscuit scraps, repeat to try and use them up. Arrange biscuits in a 12-inch cast iron skillet as close together as possible. Sprinkle tops with sea salt. Bake for 14-16 minutes, or until golden brown. Serve warm.

Make the Sweet Potato Butter:
Place the sweet potato, apple, grapefruit juice and lemon juice in a food processor and process on high until the mixture is relatively smooth.

Transfer to a medium saucepan, stir in the remaining ingredients, and place the pan over medium heat. Cook down for about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. The mixture will bubble and hiss quite a bit. Continue cooking until it thickens and smells caramelized. Stir often to avoid burning or sticking. Transfer the sweet potato butter back to the food processor and process until smooth and velvety. Spoon into clean jars and refrigerate for up to a month.

Comments

  1. Adriana

    Sorghum syrup, that’s new to me, I don’t think I can find it where I live, would you suggest an alternative?. I love sweet potatoes, would really love to try your biscuits with the sweet potato butter.

    1. megang

      Hi, Adriana! Sorghum syrup is more common in the South, and has a really nice depth of flavor, but maple syrup will be a great substitute, so go ahead and use that. Enjoy!

  2. Jennifer

    Hi Megan - These look fantastic! I love biscuits and sweet potatoes, too. Can you tell me WHERE you go that beautiful wooden biscuit cutter? Thanks.

    1. megang

      Hi, Jennifer! It was a gift from colleagues at The Kitchn a few years back ... I know, isn't it beautiful!? I'm sorry I can't help point you where to find it, but I'll keep my eyes open for you :)

      1. Jennifer

        I found a few similar on Etsy so I think I'll give one a try. Thanks for sending me down a fun rabbit hole. :)

  3. Glory

    I’m so excited to read this post. I have read your blog from the beginning to now over the past month (-ish). I really enjoy your writing and seeing the great photos as well as the reminder to eat more whole grains and less refined sugars. Even more because your recipes are so good! My babies are in their 30’s now and I still remember how difficult the days could be so I nod along while reading about your days with O!

  4. Tegan Adams

    This is my favorite line: "So today I’m here to tell you that these are not the best biscuits I’ve ever had. "
    Made me laugh out loud, a much needed break in my Friday. Love reading your stuff, and your "real-talk" about motherhood. I have a son who's almost a year and a half so it's fun to see what Oliver is up to.

    1. megang

      Thank you, Tegan!

  5. Ann R

    Is there a good substitute for cast iron pan?

    1. megang

      Hi, Ann. Cast iron is great because the edges will be a little crisp, but you could certainly use any oven-safe casserole dish or pan that you'd like. Enjoy!

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