Smoky Butternut Squash and Three Bean Chili

Smoky Butternut Squash and Three Bean Chili | A Sweet SpoonfulIf your house is anything like ours, last week wasn’t our most inspired in terms of cooking. We’re all suffering from the post-election blues — the sole upside being Oliver’s decision to sleep-in until 7 am for the first time in many, many months; I think he’s trying to tell us that pulling the covers over our heads and hibernating for awhile is ok. It’s half-convincing. For much of the week, instead of cooking, there’d been takeout pizza and canned soup before, at week’s end, I decided it was time to pour a glass of wine and get back into the kitchen. I was craving something hearty and comforting that we could eat for a few days. Something that wouldn’t remind me too much of Thanksgiving because, frankly, I can’t quite gather the steam to start planning for that yet. It was time for a big bowl of chili.

Smoky Butternut Squash and Three Bean Chili | A Sweet Spoonful

Now chili tends to be one of those things people have really strong opinions about. Some say vegetarian chili isn’t real chili, others insist you must use dried beans versus canned. Purists insist you can’t include many vegetables or you should just call it a stew and leave chili well enough alone. When I realized I’d never posted a chili recipe on the site, this is probably why: like elections, impassioned culinary debates can be exhausting. That said, we can’t just talk brussels sprouts all month long; maybe, just maybe, a good, hearty three bean chili is just the kick we all need to get us through these busy weeks ahead.

I’ve been making a version of this chili since my college days in Boulder, CO. There were lots of beans and legumes in those days as they were inexpensive and easy to come by and, as a pretty strict vegetarian at the time, they were my primary source of protein. Since then, the recipe has grown up a bit with a more delicate balance of spices, colorful cubes of butternut squash, and a blend of three beans. The base is a really rich and simple tomato sauce spiked with a little chipotle pepper and smoked paprika. Once the chili’s served, we load it up with avocado and a little cheese, sliced green onions and sour cream and if I’m feeling really productive, I’ll even throw cornbread into the mix.

Smoky Butternut Squash and Three Bean Chili | A Sweet SpoonfulBut when to actually find the hour to bust out this chili (or any chili. Or any dinner, really) is, of course, a question for the ages. Three days a week Sam’s sister comes over to watch Oliver while we go about our workday. Usually I head out to my office at Marge to oversee things there, which leaves me trying to jam in recipe development work or meal prep for our own family in stolen moments in the mornings or evening. And the thing about those stolen moments is they become seriously abbreviated (and downright stressful) if I’m trying to clean up and wash dishes as I go. So when method reached out and encouraged me to free up some time in the kitchen this holiday season by just cooking, letting the mess happen, and coming back to it later — I hopped on board.

Smoky Butternut Squash and Three Bean Chili | A Sweet Spoonful

We’ve been using method’s dish and hand soaps at home for a long time — the spare, simple design looks great on the countertop, but they’re also non-toxic (which is even more important to me now that I’m a mom) and they actually smell subtle and clean (with over 70 different scent options, people) — like cucumbers, say, not chemicals.

Smoky Butternut Squash and Three Bean Chili | A Sweet Spoonful

The takeaway to their challenge? Sure, the dishes obviously didn’t disappear and we clearly had to do them later that night, but creating a concentrated period of time in the day to get back in the kitchen and cook a meal without all the tidying and cleaning and obsessing over polling results and what sense pundits can (or cannot, as it turns out) make of it all was actually quite freeing. Less hustle, less stress and a little more play — which we could all use more of right now.

Smoky Butternut Squash and Three Bean Chili | A Sweet Spoonful

Smoky Butternut Squash and Three Bean Chili

Smoky Butternut Squash and Three Bean Chili

  • Yield: Serves 6
  • Prep time: 20 mins
  • Cook time: 40 mins
  • Total time: 1 hr

With a rich and flavorful tomato base, a good hit of garlic, soft bits of butternut squash and a combination of three beans, this chili is colorful, hearty comfort food. Beyond the initial chopping, it comes together relatively quickly and is largely inactive cook time, so if you shop for the ingredients the day before, I think it could definitely be a weeknight dinner contender. The jalapeno does add some heat, so if that’s not your thing or you’re cooking for smaller palettes, feel free to just omit it. Make sure you use fresh, fragrant spices for the best flavor and stock up on a few things to dress it up: sour cream, avocado and thinly sliced green onions are key.

Ingredients

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 large yellow onion, diced
1 large red pepper, chopped
1 small butternut squash (about 1 pound), peeled and cut into ½-inch cubes
1 medium jalapeno pepper, stemmed, seeded and minced (optional)
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 tablespoons chili powder
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoons smoked paprika
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 28- ounce can diced tomatoes with their juices
1 15 - ounce can pinto beans, rinsed and drained
1 15 - ounce black beans, rinsed and drained
1 15 – ounce can kidney beans, rinsed and drained
1 tablespoon finely chopped chipotle chiles, canned in adobo sauce * (see note below)
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more to season
+ For Serving: fresh cilantro leaves, chopped green onion, sliced avocado, lime wedges, grated cheddar cheese and sour cream.

Instructions

In a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat until shimmering. Add the onion, red pepper, squash and a generous pinch of salt and cook until onions are transluscent and peppers are tender, about 7 minutes. Add the jalapeno, garlic, chili powder, cumin, smoked paprika and cayenne pepper. Stir to coat, and continue to cook for additional 1-2 minutes.

Add the diced tomatoes and their juices, beans, chipotle chiles, tomato paste, salt and one cup water. Stir well. Bring the mixture to a low simmer and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the squash is tender, about 30 minutes. Reduce heat if chili begins to boil. Taste and add additional seasoning, if desired. Serve with your favorite garnishes. Leftover chili, if covered and refrigerated, is good for 4-5 days.

* Note: If you don’t have an immediate use for the leftover chipotle chiles, blend them up in the food processor or blender and freeze the paste to season future chiles and soups.

Comments

  1. Cathy

    Looks superb. Do you think sweet potato could be subbed for the squash, as I have lots of those...?

    1. megang

      Absolutely, Cathy! I thought about using sweet potato instead, actually, and think they'd be great in the chili. Enjoy!

  2. Rachael

    Just saw squash at the local farm stand for $1 each! Guess I'll be heading there, and then making this! ❤️

  3. Carole

    How I wish a bowl of anything could cleanse and comfort after the election. Time to love each other through it and make something better in whatever way we can, wherever we can. Maybe a bowl of this chili for someone in need.

  4. RACHELE

    This is my new go to vegetarian chili recipe. I did add the juice of two limes at the end of cooking...it added a nice extra flavor layer to the sweet and spicy. Thanks for the recipe!

  5. Nicki

    Would this work in a slow cooker without having to sauté the onions and garlic before hand?

    1. megang

      Hi, Nicki-
      I think it sure should. And since the beans are canned (not dried), I don't think it'll take all that long on low (maybe 2 hours?). Let me know how it turns out!

  6. Carla

    My husband made it for us tonight! So yummy (he used sweet potatoe)

    1. megang

      So glad to hear it, Carla! I'm going to try it with sweet potatoes next time!

    2. megang

      Yay, Carla! So glad you both enjoyed it.

  7. Jen

    This recipe is delicious! It's everything I hope for in a vegetarian chili. I'll definitely make it again.

    1. megang

      Thanks so much, Jen! I'm so happy to hear you enjoyed it.

  8. Jeanine

    Do you have any suggestions for adapting this for a pressure cooker (instant pot is my new favorite toy!)

    1. megang

      Gosh Jeanine, I don't actually. I don't have an Instant Pot or pressure cooker, although my sister is adamant I'm really missing out. I hear they're great! Sorry I can't help more in that regard. Enjoy!

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