Perfect Protein Chickpea Salad

Perfect Protein Chickpea Deli Salad | A Sweet SpoonfulLast weekend I taught a cooking class called Summer Whole Grain Bowls at The Pantry. It was a new class for me: new recipes, new flow, uncertain timing.  A few days before the class I realized I was strangely dreading it, and I usually love teaching so I couldn’t quite figure out why. Part of it certainly was that it was new material, but the other part came down to pure baby logistics. Oliver is still nursing so being away from him and prepping and teaching students for 5-6 hours ends up being stressful and, frankly, uncomfortable. To pull it off involves a partner who brings you the baby the second class is over as well as a baby patient enough to nurse in the back of a very hot car, balanced next to a box of  cookbooks and a case of Le Croix. And then a mama who heads back indoors to prep for the next day’s class. Let’s just say Sam and I were happy to see Sunday evening roll around.

Perfect Protein Chickpea Salad | A Sweet Spoonful

All of that being said, the class was spectacular. The students were interested and engaged and really excited to learn. I feared the topic would feel too pedestrian and that there wasn’t enough technique involved — let’s face it, we weren’t making homemade croissants. We were whipping up simple dressings, cooking up pots of grains, and chopping and slicing beautiful summer produce to mix together salads for lunch. But I have to continually remind myself that cooking a variety of whole grains and figuring out what to do with them is new to a lot of people. The thing I’m hearing more and more from students these days is that they’re most excited to take classes that give them the little nudge they need to try a few new recipes that they can actually make at home in a short period of time. Recipes that will help them prep for the work week. Recipes that can serve as a quick dinner without much fuss or stress. So while we weren’t learning how to incorporate layers of butter into homemade croissants, we were talking all about how to realistically feed our families and ourselves. How to avoid that Sad Desk Lunch. I left really inspired by their energy and enthusiasm, and I think they felt similarly. And it’s possible I made some new freekeh and millet fans. Here’s hoping.

The recipe I’m sharing with you today isn’t one that I taught in class, but it might as well have been. It’s one that I’ve added into the Megan’s Favorites category on this site, and it definitely deserves prime real estate there. Our local coop here in Seattle, PCC, makes a killer deli salad called Perfect Protein Salad and when I’m racing out the door to work, fully realizing I have nothing to eat for lunch, I zip in there for a quick container of it. And a coconut water if I’m feeling like really treating myself. Maybe some dark chocolate peanut butter cups, too. My employees can attest to the fact that it’s either that or a frozen burrito which just seems slightly sad on most days. So not enough. So … frozen.

Perfect Protein Chickpea Salad | A Sweet Spoonful

What I love about this salad is that it feels so fresh and light yet also really substantial. It’s made from a base of whole grains and chickpeas with bits of carrot, celery, onion, fresh parsley, and herbs folded in — all tossed in a creamy blend of mayonnaise, lemon juice and apple cider vinegar. It’s quite humble in most ways: no trendy ingredients, no flashy seasoning. It’s the kind of salad I imagine was a real hit in the 70’s, and has miraculously hung around.  Last month I decided to look online to see if anyone had tried to recreate the salad, and what I found was far better: PCC has published the recipe! All those mornings of pulling (speeding?) into the parking lot and racing in to grab a pint could’ve been at least partially avoided by having a homemade batch on hand. So while cooking up a pot of grains was about the last thing I felt like doing after cooking up many pots of grains all weekend with  my students, I put some wheat berries on the stove Sunday evening and started chopping carrots, cucumber and parsley. We always have cans of chickpeas on hand, so it came together really quickly.

I called Sam into the kitchen when it was done and had him taste it, asking him to report back. What does it remind you of? He wasn’t answering as quickly as I’d hoped. C’mon, what is this?! His answer still wasn’t forthcoming, his overall enthusiasm for the salad perhaps not as fierce as mine. All of that’s to say, we both took it for lunch twice this week and were immensely happy and grateful that it was in the fridge. I’m newly inspired to walk the walk and cook pots of grains on the weekends like I used to do pre-Oliver, so that hearty salads are (almost) just as easy as grabbing that frozen burrito.

Perfect Protein Chickpea Salad

Perfect Protein Chickpea Salad

  • Yield: 6-8 servings
  • Prep time: 25 mins
  • Cook time: 45 mins
  • Total time: 1 hr 5 mins

I find that this chickpea salad is perfect on its own for a light lunch. But if we’ve got an abundance of greens or if I’m feeling slightly fancy, I’ll serve it on a bed of arugula or spinach — with a few good stirs, I don’t even need dressing as the light sauce from the chickpeas dresses the greens perfectly.

A few ingredient notes: while this salad calls for spelt or wheat berries, you can use any hearty grain you like, really. Farro would be a strong candidate and barley would be great (just don’t overcook it). In the original recipe, they use a vegan mayonnaise, but I use the real thing here (and a little more of it). If you are vegan, feel free to make that substitution. I also think using half plain yogurt would work just fine. And fresh herbs! By all means swap them in. The original recipe calls for dried and I remained pretty true to it, but I think next time some fresh chives would be really nice.

Slightly adapted from: PCC

Ingredients

3 cups water
1 cup (180g) spelt or wheat berries
2 (14-ounce) cans garbanzo beans
1 English cucumber - peeled, seeded and diced (about 1 1/2 cups/120g)
1 green bell pepper, seeds removed and diced (about 1 cup /130g)
3 ribs celery, diced (1 cup/120g)
1 carrot, peeled and diced (1/2 cup/65g)
1/4 red onion, finely diced (1/2 cup/60g)
1/2 bunch green onions, thinly sliced (about 1/3 cup/40g)
1/3 bunch parsley, chopped (1 1/2 cups/45g)
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 1/2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
3/4 teaspoon dried dill
1 teaspoon salt, plus more to season
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon minced garlic

Instructions

Add 3 cups of water to a medium pot and add the spelt berries. Over medium-high heat, bring the water to a boil. Reduce heat to low and cover, cooking until tender but still chewy, about 45 minutes. Drain and cool.

In a salad, bowl mix together cooked spelt berries, garbanzo beans, diced cucumbers, green pepper, celery, carrots, red onions, green onions and chopped parsley.

Mix together mayonnaise, lemon juice, vinegar, dill, salt, basil and garlic; pour over salad and mix well. Serve immediately or refrigerate. Salad will stay fresh for up to 4 days, covered, in the refrigerator.

Comments

  1. Tucsonbabe

    Looks delicious. Why not fresh herbs rather than dry?

    1. megang

      You could totally use fresh herbs. This recipe just so happened to use dried and we had them on hand so I went with it. I was thinking to myself that fresh chives would be really nice ...

  2. Dana

    If I had all-day off-site meetings at work, I would pack my breast pump in the car with the car adapter and in between meetings find a parking lot with shade away from the beaten path and do what I needed to do! That's a few years back now and I just laugh to think of the places I nursed or pumped!!
    At-work lactation is more common now (some states require facilities are provided), I wonder if you can ask at your locations where you would be able to nurse more comfortably in between classes?? Even a quiet corner?
    Oh, but I remember that feeling of hours away from your baby!!

    1. megang

      Hi, Dana. Oh yes ... when I'm working at cafes I definitely sneak away to the car to pump. And when at the office, I'm lucky enough to have enough privacy to pump right at my desk. Good time to catch up with family on the phone :) This was kind of a unique situation in that I was racing around prepping for a few hours before class and then literally in front of students the remaining time so pumping not as much of an option. In our house we call this "boob logistics." It usually works out just fine but sometimes, like when teaching cooking classes, can be a bit of a "thing." Thank you so much for your nice comment!

  3. Lori

    I am going to make this for lunch today! It looks amazing. As for babies I remember those days and the challenges of it all. I was freelancing at Restoration Hardware when Josh was a baby and I'd go into the bathroom to pump. To get there I'd slink past a few people with my backpack always feeling a little weird so one day I told one of them what was in the pack -- a pump -- and they asked why I didn't use the nursing room! Turns out that instead of the bathroom I could have been in a small, private room with a big, comfy chair, sink, etc. It was great.

    1. megang

      Oh gosh ... pumping in the bathroom. I have been there (in an airport) and it is no fun. I can't imagine doing that everyday for a good chunk of time. It is certainly a thing, isn't it, feeding these little ones? I'm so grateful that I'm able to do it and love feeding Oliver ... but in truth I can't wait for the pumping days to be over. No fun! Thanks for the sweet comment, Lori.

  4. Denise

    Just going to say it - wish we lived closer as I would enjoy being one of those students in your class learning about grains, and well, just spending time together. I just bought a bag of spelt flour to play with thanks to my new favorite cookbook New Roots -we have been trying to be plant based more at home. Anyhow, I immediately thought of you when i bought it and wondered, what would Megan make.

    Digging this salad - we have been making something very similar for our working at home lunches. I have not tried adding any grains or even carrots for that matter, so next time I will have to plan a bit ahead and give it a whirl.

    1. megang

      Awww, so nice to see your name pop up here, D. Yes, I love spelt flour and really love the My New Roots cookbook - I haven't cooked enough from it, so good little nudge to crack it open again. I'd love to catch up with you soon; we have more childcare now so more work/me time; let's plan a phone date? xox

  5. Julie

    Quite frankly, this is pure serendipity. I have been longing for a new way with chickpea salad--bless you! Keep up the great work!

    1. megang

      Aww, thanks Julie! I hope you enjoy the salad! Have a great weekend.

  6. Beth

    This looks great!!! I really dislike mayo though, would using just plain yogurt work ok?

    1. megang

      I think it could, Beth. It may be a bit tart, but I've thought that next time I make this I'm going to use half mayo and half yogurt. If you use all yogurt, let me know what you think.

  7. Rachel

    I just made this for an easy Sunday (and hopefully into the week) lunch. So great! I used some mystery grains from the pantry, which I thought might have been spelt but I think turned out to be barley. I did 1/2 c Greek yogurt and 2 Tbs mayo. I thought the dressing was delicious; the dill was just what it needed. This is probably one of those nice salad recipes where you really can't go wrong adjusting to your preferences. Thanks for sharing!

    1. megang

      Awesome, Rachel. So glad you liked it. In truth, I too used mystery grains and I think they're wheat berries but am not 100% certain. So yes, you're right: I think you can't go wrong. I'm going to try your yogurt proportions next time. Enjoy the week!

  8. Kate

    Made this today- delicious!!!'I made it with the trader joe's 10 minute bulgur and fresh dill- wonderful!

    1. megang

      Gosh I love that idea, Kate! Even quicker. Fantastic.

  9. Ashley

    Yes! I know this salad. I can't wait to make it myself.

    1. megang

      Sooooo good. Next time I want to cut it with some yogurt, I think ... xo

  10. Kate

    This looks great! Any thoughts on how long this could stay good in the fridge?

    1. megang

      Hi, Kate! The recipe definitely says to eat it immediately or the day you make it, but we ended up having leftovers and had them up to two days after making it. I'd say that by the third day things start getting a little mushy. Enjoy it!

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