Fresh Blueberry Ice Cream (Dairy Free)

Fresh Blueberry Ice Cream | A Sweet Spoonful

Two Saturdays ago, we hopped in the car and drove up to Bow, WA to pick blueberries. I envisioned coming home with a huge bucket and having that wonderful seasonal quandary: what to do with all of these berries?! Instead, we came home with a pound and a half: It turns out that picking berries in the hot August sun with an active baby is a slow endeavor — and it’s possible I kept snacking on our loot. When we got home (after blueberry ice cream sandwiches and a stop at the OshKosh B’Gosh outlet for some baby suspenders) I knew exactly what we’d do with our “haul:” fresh blueberry ice cream. And hopefully, if we had a few leftover, pancakes the next morning.

Fresh Blueberry Ice Cream | A Sweet SpoonfulWe did have pancakes the next morning. And even the next morning after that. I’ll admit we’ve been using a mix that we both love (Hayden Flour Mills, a previous client of Sam’s, makes killer whole grain pancake mixes). In addition to a little help in the mornings, we’ve also been ordering dinner from one of those make-it-yourself meal services more often than I’d care to admit. For awhile there, we seemed to have the work, baby, dinner shuffle down, but for two people to get in a full workday, perhaps exercise, and come home to make a homemade dinner? These days, that’s a tall order. Even with pancake mixes and pre-made dinner, we are generally feeling chronically behind. I gather this is something that never goes away when you have kids. And really, I hate to make it specific to kids: I know many of you with bulging inboxes and demanding jobs feel this way, too. We’re all in the thick of it.

Fresh Blueberry Ice Cream | A Sweet SpoonfulLast week I texted my mom after getting home with a trunk full of new plants and potting soil, feeling triumphant that I finally got out into the backyard and dressed up the patio a bit. There were bursts or orange and yellow and lazy, lingering swathes of blue. My mom sweetly noted that, judging from the photograph, they all looked like annuals, reminding me that they will all die. Soon. Like perhaps next month. Apparently most people plant their annuals in late spring or early summer. Not August. Like I said, we’re a few steps behind over here. At least right about now, despite a rather meek blueberry haul, we’ve got some homemade ice cream to show for it all.

Fresh Blueberry Ice Cream | A Sweet Spoonful

The original recipe for this ice cream was actually for a raspberry flavor in the wonderful new cookbook Icy, Creamy, Healthy, Sweet by Christine Chitnis. Last month Christine came to Seattle to promote the book and I had the chance to go to a little ice cream shindig at The Pantry in the middle of the day in the middle of the week which, when you have two businesses and a baby, basically felt like the equivalent of jetting off to Hawaii. And getting to hear Christine’s philosophy on frozen desserts (natural sugars, fresh fruits, non-dairy bases) had me so inspired that when I got home I really wasn’t sure where to begin.

Fresh Blueberry Ice Cream | A Sweet Spoonful

For the record, I’m not vegan and I happen to really, really love real dairy ice creams. But I also love anything with coconut milk, so I’m generally a sucker for dairy-free ice creams, too (you are possibly sensing that, in this department, I’m not terribly discerning). I was also really intrigued by Christine’s formula: She relies on cashew cream in addition to coconut milk to make her ice cream super creamy and scoopable.

I think one big thing that can turn people off of dairy-free ice cream is the fact that so many get hard and icy once frozen. Christine notes that  most commercial ice creams are nice and soft straight out of the freezer thanks to stabilizers or large ice cream machines that can incorporate more air. For that reason, this ice cream (and many homemade recipes, for that matter) is best right after you churn it; if you freeze and serve it later, just plan to allow it to thaw for 10-15 minutes to bring it back to its original creamy state — the perfect amount of time to sit back and admire those soon-to-die annuals.

Fresh Blueberry Ice Cream (Dairy Free)

Fresh Blueberry Ice Cream (Dairy Free)

  • Yield: 1 Heaping Pint
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 5 mins
  • Inactive time: 4 hrs 20 mins
  • Total time: 4 hrs 40 mins

This recipe calls for arrowroot starch (or arrowroot flour) as a thickener because it has a neutral flavor and stands up really well to freezing — so it helps prevent ice crystals from forming. It should be readily available in the spice aisles of most well-stocked groceries, but if you can’t find it, I imagine that cornstarch will do in a pinch. Christine originally used raspberries here, so feel free to use any berry you’d like. She also added 3 ounces of chopped dark chocolate, but I left it out this time around to let the flavor of the fresh berries really shine. Last, do note that the cashew cream takes a day to pull together (it’s all inactive time, but the cashews do need an overnight soak, so plan for that).

Adapted from: Icy, Creamy, Healthy, Sweet

Ingredients

For the Cashew Cream:

1 cup filtered water
1 cup whole raw cashews
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

For the Ice Cream Base:

2 cups fresh blueberries
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 (13.5 oz) can full fat coconut milk
1 tablespoon arrowroot starch
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup honey

Instructions

To make the cashew cream: Place cashews in a bowl and add enough cold filtered water to cover them completely. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator overnight to soak.

Drain the cashews and rinse well. Place them in a blender with 1 cup cold filtered water and the salt and blend on high speed for several minutes, until smooth.

If you’re not using a high speed blender (like a Vitamix), you may need to strain through a fine-mesh sieve to strain away any remaining solid. As a note, I have a very standard blender and didn’t have to do this step. Mine blended up just fine. Store in a covered jar for up to 1 week in the refrigerator.

Make the ice cream: Rinse and dry blueberries and place in a large bowl. Toss with lemon juice and set aside.

Pour 2 tablespoons of the coconut milk into a small bowl, add the arrowroot starch, and whisk until dissolved. In a small saucepan, combine the arrowroot slurry, the remaining coconut milk, the vanilla, salt and honey. Place over low heat, bring to a simmer and cook, stirring, until the honey is dissolved into the coconut milk, 3-5 minutes. Remove from the pan and allow the mixture to cool.

Pour the berries into the base of a blender and add the coconut milk mixture. Add the cashew cream and blend until berries are broken up and cashew cream and coconut milk are incorporated completely.  I like to see little bits of blueberry in my ice cream so I didn’t completely pulverize mine, but if you like a smoother consistency, feel free to do so. Cover the mixture and chill in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours and up to 1 day.

Freeze in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. You can eat the ice cream right away for a softer scoop, or freeze for about 2 hours for a firmer consistency.

 

 

Comments

  1. Kasey

    Such a fun trip, and your photos turned out beautifully! We ended up just straight up eating all of our blueberries, but I wish I had some left to whip up some blueberry ice cream. That color! xo

    1. megang

      Thanks, friend! Yeahhhhh.... I wish we'd picked just a few more :) Super fun trip - so glad we went!

  2. Patty Brantley

    Jean would of loved this, dairy free! Looks tasty and l love the color!

    1. megang

      Awww, Patty! You're right! Dairy free was critical for Jean :) xoxo

  3. Ashley

    We picked 9 pounds and they are nearly gone. In fact, I went digging through the freezer just today and couldn't find them so perhaps they are indeed gone. There are NEVER enough. You've inspired me to 1. make ice cream and 2. grab that book and take a deeper look.

    1. megang

      9 pounds! Magic! Next time we need to be a bit more ambitious ... I had big plans for scones and muffins, but we'll have to stock up at the farmers market instead. And yes, the book is great! I want to make the coffee frozen yogurt next.

  4. m

    whatif you don't have an ice cream maker?

    1. megang

      Hi, m - This recipe does require an ice cream maker, sadly. There are a number of recipes online that don't require one, so hopefully you can find one you're excited about. Best of luck!

  5. Heidi - Apples Under My Bed

    Another lovely recipe, thank you, Megan! Really, truly excited for spring & summer now. Also a big fan of pancakes in our house, Joan has been loving banana buckwheat+spelt pancakes I've' been making. Bring on blueberry pancakes too! I don't know if I ever told you, but I gifted some friends of mine who live in the USA your granola after they had their bubba. And they absolutely loved it. My friend is from Australia and found it hard to find granola/muesli that was tasty and not too sweet in the US, so was thrilled to find Marge x

    1. megang

      Aww that's so sweet, Heidi. Thank you so much for thinking of Marge + I'm so glad they enjoyed it. Such a good new momma / parent gift, isn't it? We had friends help us with dinners, but I found snacks / breakfast sorely neglected. I had a friend send breakfast cookies that I ended up snacking on during those early morning feeds and I was so appreciative. Yes to whole grain pancakes! My favorite. Can't wait for Oliver to be able to eat a bit more interesting, solid foods. Thanks for the sweet comment, Heidi. xo

  6. Amy

    Ok, so what's the deal with filtered water? Will tap water adversely affect the outcome? I'm excited about this recipe, I can't eat dairy right now while I'm nursing our newborn, and I miss ice cream so much!!

    1. megang

      Hi, Amy! I totally used regular tap water and should probably make a note of that so people know. I'm not really certain the science behind the filtered water but go forth with your normal tap water and all will be well. Sorry about the dairy (but yay for nursing!). Thankfully lots of good dairy-free options out there (have you tried Coconut Bliss brand ice cream? So good!)

  7. Rachel

    Hello! I'm making this ice cream tonight for a dinner party (so excited!). I bought frozen blueberries because I just couldn't stomach the price of two cups of fresh blueberries. I am confident it *can* work with frozen blueberries, but do you have any ideas for how this might affect the recipe?

    I'll let you know how it turns out if you're interested =)

    1. megang

      Geesh, Rachel I don't know!!! I hope they won't be icy and hard ... please do update us as I'm curious (and I feel you on the price of fresh berries). Have fun!

    2. Rachel

      Hi Megan! It turned out so well. I didn't change anything in how I did the recipe except that I didn't let the blueberries sit with the lemon juice - I just added them both to the blender once I had made the coconut milk mixture. The texture was perfectly creamy with no icy crystals.

      Unrelated to the frozen blueberries, I also added the zest of half a lemon to give it an extra tangy kick! Everyone loved the ice cream and said it tasted like blueberry cheesecake. In the future, I might try candied lemon peel as a mix-in =)

    3. megang

      Fantastic! I'm so glad to hear this, and looking forward to being able to make this year-round then, rather than only during fresh berry season. Thanks for the update, Rachel!

  8. An Icy Creamy Wrap-up – Christine Chitnis

    […] Healthy Sweet in both his 25 Books I’m Loving Spring and Summer editions! *Megan Gordon of A Sweet Spoonful went blueberry picking and made this vibrant blueberry ice […]

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