Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies (Plus a Treat for You)

Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies | A Sweet Spoonful
Strolling New York City streets during the height of fall when all the leaves are changing and golden light glints off the brownstone windows. This is what I envisioned when I bought tickets to attend my cousin’s September wedding earlier this month: Sam and I would extend the trip for a good day or two so we could experience a little bit of fall in the city. We’d finally eat at Prune and have scones and coffee at Buvette, as we always do. Sam wanted to take me to Russ and Daughters, and we’d try to sneak in a new bakery or ice cream shop for good measure. Well, as some of you likely know, my thinking on the weather was premature. New York City fall had yet to descend and, instead, we ambled around the city in a mix of humidity and rain. When we returned home I found myself excited about the crisp evening air, and the fact that the tree across the street had turned a rusty shade of amber. It was time to do a little baking. 

These cookies were a real treat to make for many reasons — the main one being that they’re made with all purpose einkorn flour from Jovial Foods and the recipe is from Carla Bartolucci’s new cookbook, Einkorn: Recipes for Nature’s Original Wheat. I worked with Carla and the Jovial Foods team a few years ago, helping them develop recipes for their website and blog using the flour. If you’re not familiar with the grain einkorn or einkorn flour, it is a wheat similar to emmer, spelt, durum and soft wheat, but it’s an ancient species that’s more nutritious than modern wheat (30% more protein and more B vitamins and antioxidants). Many people who don’t tolerate modern wheat claim to do just fine with einkorn (Bartolucci’s daughter, for example) and after moving from Connecticut to Italy in 2006, Carla became enamored with the grain for that reason alone and began the process of growing, harvesting and selling einkorn.

Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies | A Sweet Spoonful

If you’re interested in the way that einkorn’s gluten is different from other wheats or how baking with einkorn flour is different than baking with an all-purpose flour, Carla’s cookbook has some great information. After working with this flour for a few years, I can attest to how easy it is to incorporate into your favorite recipes — which is exactly what the Einkorn cookbook does. It’s a breath of fresh air in its approach to recipes: there aren’t 15 adjectives per recipe title or overly fancy, fussy baked goods. This is food you actually are going to want to bake for your typical week: Coconut Pound Cake, Einkorn Cornbread, Slow Rise Classic Sticky Buns, Ciabatta. But now we need to talk about these cookies.

I’ve made Ginger Molasses Cookies on the blog before a few years back, and I love the recipe. They are a different beast though: they are bigger and have more heft thanks to the bread flour. These cookies I’m sharing with you today have more of a subtle spice profile and a really nice, light chewy texture. These are snacking cookies. These are breakfast cookies. These are evening tea cookies. The method is quite simple and nothing you won’t be familiar with: they’re essentially a wet and dry ingredient affair, so pretty difficult to truly mess up. I will say, however, that you’re going to pull the cookies out of the oven and it’s going to seem as though they’re not done: they’ll be quite soft in the middle. But trust that they firm up as they cool. If you leave them in the oven longer (as I did with my first batch) you’ll end up with much more of a crisp, gingersnap texture. And while those certainly didn’t go to waste in our house, chewiness always reigns, no?

Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies | A Sweet Spoonful

Because they’re so enthusiastic to share their wonderful einkorn flours and products with you, Jovial Foods is offering a 15% discount and free shipping (!!) on everything in their online shop (excluding grain mills and the cookbook); to redeem the discount, simply type in the code SWEETSPOONFUL at checkout. Offer expires 10/22/15.

While you can’t use the discount code for the cookbook, it is already an amazing deal through their website (and it’s autographed); it sells for a 25% discount off list price, and they offer free shipping. And towards the end of October, Jovial Foods will begin to sell their whole grain einkorn flour again (versus the all-purpose einkorn flour which I used for this recipe), which will be a treat to work with, so keep an eye out for that. You can sign up to be notified when it’s back in stock and ready to order.

I hope you all enjoy the recipe and are finding a little piece of early fall wherever you live.

Note: I was sent a review copy of Einkorn, as well as a complimentary bag of Jovial Foods einkorn flour to use for this recipe. 

Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies

Soft and Chewy Ginger Cookies

  • Yield: 16
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 16 mins
  • Inactive time: 15 mins
  • Total time: 46 mins

The reason for using melted butter instead of creamed butter in a cookie is to release the small amount of water in the butter into the flour quickly. This helps develop the flour’s gluten and gives a chewier rather than crispy texture to the cookie. This technique works perfectly with einkorn flour, since the flour is slower to absorb fats, and the wonderfully soft texture of these ginger cookies is proof of that. The cookies come out of the oven really soft and although they might look underbaked, they set up perfectly after cooling.

Reprinted from Einkorn

Ingredients

2 1/2 cups (300 g) all-purpose einkorn flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
10 tablespoons (138 g) unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
1/2 cup (100 g) granulated sugar, plus 3 tablespoons for dusting
1/3 cup (73 g) (packed) dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons unsulphured molasses
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 large egg

Instructions

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

2. In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, baking soda, and salt.

3.  In a second bowl, stir together the butter, the 1⁄2 cup granulated sugar, the brown sugar, molasses, ginger, and cinnamon. Add the egg and whisk together until well combined. Add the flour mixture and mix with a spatula until the dry ingredients are no longer visible. Let stand for 15 minutes to give the flour time to absorb the wet ingredients.

4. Spread the remaining 3 tablespoons granulated sugar on a small plate. Roll 1 1/2-inch (45 g) balls of dough between your hands and roll them in the sugar to dust completely.

5. Place the balls 2 inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 16 minutes until the cookies have spread and are barely firm to the touch. Let the cookies cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes, then transfer to a rack to cool completely. The cookies can be stored in an airtight container for up to 3 days.

Comments

  1. Emily | Gather & Dine

    I have wanted to give Einkorn flour a try, but it's so hard to find! (even my local Whole Foods didn't carry it!) So happy to have this discount and free shipping offer! And btw, we make the breakfast cookies from your cookbook all of the time. Love them so much.

    1. megang

      Oh thanks so much, Emily. I love the breakfast cookie recipe! It's probably the one we make the most around here, too. Yes, einkorn flour is still tough to find -- hopefully not for too much longer. Enjoy the discount / recipe, ~Megan

  2. Kate

    I cannot resist a chewy molasses cookie! I've never tried einkorn flour, but these look too good not to try.

  3. Ann

    I'm itching to bake these. Is einkorn flour a wholemeal plain (all purpose) flour?

    1. megang

      Good question, Ann. Jovial Foods makes both. I used an all purpose for these cookies but am itching to get my hands on the whole grain plain. Enjoy!

  4. Jael

    These cookies were so easy to make, and so delicious! Thank you so much for the recipe!

    1. megang

      Thank you Jael! So glad you all enjoyed them!

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