Triple Berry Skillet Crisp

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For such a light, bright, colorful few months — summer is the season that makes the biggest statement, but also the season that blasts on through the quickest. But with the blasting comes the overgrown lawns, neighborhood walks at 9:45 p.m. when it’s still light out (!) and dinners consisting of heaping servings of strawberry crisp. Or how about the impromptu sidewalk picnics at lunchtime or the beautiful, blooming Dogwood trees lining the block? Seattle, maybe a little more than some sunnier cities, waits hard for this time of year. I’d like for you all to know that I’ve locked the winter coat away for good, and while the raincoat is definitely making an appearance of late, I hope not to look at a stitch of fleece for a good few months. And to eat more berry crisp for dinner — which brings us all here right now.

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I received Kimberly’s new cookbook, Vibrant Food, in the mail a few weeks ago and one of the recipes that immediately jumped out at me was the Summer Berry and Peach Crisp.  I met Kimberly through her blog  The Year in Food; we both had friends and cities in common and she’s so genuine that we hit it off right away. In addition to recipe development, Kimberly is a super talented photographer, so it’s no surprise this book is a beauty, and there are so many recipes I can’t wait to make (Sweet Corn and Squash Fritters, Summer Squash Pasta with Green Goddess Dressing, Almond Honey Cake with Poached Quince). It’s organized seasonally and further categorized by produce or ingredient, so it’s not only beautiful but also useful — the best kind of books.

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When I sat down to glance at the crisp recipe, I knew peaches would be a stretch, but I’ve been trading Marge Granola for flats of strawberries at the end of each farmers market lately, so I knew we could easily be in business. With the back door wide open and a nice evening breeze accompanying me in the kitchen, I was off — mixing berries with a little lemon juice, working butter into a simple mixture of oats and nuts and greasing our cast-iron skillet (I decided to bake our crisp in a skillet instead of a more traditional casserole dish). It came out of the oven bubbling hot and fragrant at about 7 p.m. and the sun was shining and our picnic table beckoned, and there’s a chance it became dinner. And that it was enjoyed right out of the pan.

It’s my sincere hope there will be much more of that this summer. I’ve been making a list of books and podcasts and all kinds of travel and summer-related links to share with you, so more of that soon. But for now, let’s eat skillet berry crisp. Right out of the pan.

A few quick recipe notes: Kimberly’s recipe calls for a variety of fruits but you could certainly make this with any fruit you like, or more of one than another. Essentially if you have about 5 – 5 1/2 cups of fruit you’re good to go here. Because I’ve been a little crazy about sugar lately I used a little less sugar than the recipe called for and I ended up using 1 cup of quinoa flakes in the topping. If you can’t find these, certainly use oats instead. But I love their little hit of protein and they work into the cold butter so beautifully. Last, because I was too lazy to go out and buy almonds (what Kimberly suggests), I used hazelnuts and pumpkin seeds here for the nuts. Use any nuts you’d like — just keep the proportions about the same. Pecans would be great as would walnuts.

Triple Berry Skillet Crisp

Triple Berry Skillet Crisp

  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 30 mins
  • Inactive time: 10 mins
  • Total time: 55 mins

Adapted from: Vibrant Food

Ingredients

For the Filling:

3 1/2 cups (roughly one pound) hulled and quartered strawberries
1 cup blueberries
1 cup blackberries
1/4 cup natural cane sugar
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon all purpose flour (or gluten-free flour to make the crisp gluten-free)
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

For the Topping

1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
1 cup quinoa flakes
3/4 cup hazelnuts, roughly chopped
1/4 cup pumpkin seeds
1/3 cup hazelnut meal (I like Bob's Red Mill brand)
1/3 cup lightly packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut into small cubes

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375 F.

Make the filling: In a large mixing bowl, mix together the berries with the sugar, lemon juice, flour and ginger. Pour the fruit filling into a shallow 2 to 2 1/2-quart baking dish (or large oven-proof skillet!)

Make the topping: In another large bowl, combine the oats, nuts and seeds, hazelnut meal, brown sugar, salt and spices. Add the butter and use your fingers to work the dry ingredients and butter together to form a loose mixture. Sprinkle evenly over the fruit.

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the crisp is golden brown and bubbling at the edges. Allow to cool 10 minutes before serving. Serve warm. Right out of the pan, or in small bowls topped with ice cream if you’d like.

Comments

  1. Millie l Add A Little

    Love the look of this skillet crisp! And the topping looks amazing with seeds and nuts in it!
    http://youtube.com/addalittlefood

  2. Kathryn

    I'm pretty sure fruit crisp is the perfect dinner at any time of year but it's something particularly special at this time of year, bursting with juicy fruit.

  3. Kimberley

    Yes yes yes. Those summers you've got up there are my favorite, and I agree: hard won and well-deserved. We don't have 9:45 twilight here, as you know, but I think that's the trade off. I love this and I can't wait to enjoy a little bit of that summer magic with you. xo.

  4. Eileen

    Fruit crisp is definitely one of the best treats of summer! Although I must admit I have a hard time getting my berries home intact -- somehow I keep eating them all before I have a chance to bake with them. :) Going to have to exert some willpower to make this!

  5. Amy P

    I'm going to have to try this recipe next- I am loving the book too And you should make the Honey Almond Cake next- it's my current obsession!

  6. Traci | Vanilla And Bean

    Hi Megan,
    Oh yes, summer in the Pacific Northwest! I actually had a light jacket on today from the cooler breezes coming off the water. And the markets are so lush with berries right now! Isn't it wonderful?! The crumble looks inviting and I agree, would make a delicious dinner! I like how you baked this in a cast iron skillet. I'm looking forward to trying this and checking out Kimberly's book. Where can I find quinoa flakes?

    1. megang

      Hi, Traci! Sorry for the delay here .. yes, summer is what we live for here, right? So good. I find quinoa flakes at Whole Foods or PCC -- they come in a turquoise box although I've heard sometimes you can find them in bulk, too. The best bet is to look in the aisle with the Bob's Red Mill products / alternative flours and baking products. Best of luck and I hope you enjoy Kimberly's book! ~Megan

  7. molly

    Ooooh, this crisp topping sounds fantastic. I've never used quinoa flakes, but I've definitely used cast iron for crumbles, and love it to bits -- I do think it helps the topping crisp and brown a teensy bit better. Which, shhhhh, is what a crisp's for, yes? (Oh. Right. The fruit. That too!!)

    Happy, happy summer Megan.

    xo,
    Molly

    ps: I have a(nother) bowl of quinoa salad in the fridge, as I type. No joke. Cannot. Stop. Eating.

  8. Sara

    This book keeps getting praise everywhere I turn...that cover alone is quite inviting.

  9. Denise | Chez Danisse

    Your version look delicious! I think I'd love it topped with vanilla ice cream. Oh yes. Happy summer!

  10. Francesca

    ahh long summer days are the best - we get them here too with 1030 sunsets in Amsterdam. It definitely took some getting used to, but it just means more daylight hours to consume this kinda stuff :)

  11. kristie @ birchandwild.com

    Quinoa flakes are so versatile! I even used them in your farro cakes recipe in place of bread crumbs!
    And this crumble looks nutritious and delicious! I love berry season.

  12. Val

    I want make a crisp for a friend with a citrus allergy. Will leaving out the lemon juice the texture of of the crisp?

    1. megang

      Nope! Val, you'll be just fine without the lemon juice. Enjoy ~Megan

  13. Heidi Kertel

    This looks wonderful Megan! Just got your book and I just love it. I also mentioned you on my Face Book page today as my favorite good summer read. Looking forward to making some of your recipes "my own".
    Thanks!
    Heidi Kertel

    1. megang

      Thanks so much, Heidi! I'm so happy you're enjoying the site! Have a great holiday weekend, ~Megan

  14. Dana

    I made this tonight and it was wonderful. Did all Blueberry and all almonds and almond meal as that's what I had on hand. 2 questions: should this be refrigerated? There are only 2 of us, and my husband worries about leaving anything in a cast iron skillet for any length of time. Anyone???
    Thanks so much for sharing!!!

    1. megang

      Good question! I didn't refrigerate ours -- we left it out for almost three days, covered on the counter. I hope that helps and that you both enjoyed it. Have a great holiday, Megan

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