Citrus-Spiked Muesli Bars

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Last weekend I flew home to California to do a number of book events for Whole-Grain Mornings. I’ve done readings and classes here in Seattle but had yet to travel to promote the book, and it was such a treat to do so in my old stomping grounds. Sam took the train down to meet me and we stayed at my mom’s house just North of San Francisco. She threw a wonderful book party on Friday night and despite the torrential (!!) downpours, many old friends and colleagues came to join us along with a large handful of my mom’s friends and neighbors. There was Prosecco and lots of cheese and a few hours to really get to mark the completion of the cookbook. When everyone left, Sam and I took off our shoes, did the dishes and sat at the kitchen counter eating leftover olives and Jeni’s ice cream straight from the container (not sure I can vouch for this pairing for future reference). It turns out that funny mix of exhilaration and excitement but utter fatigue had hit — and it stuck around that weekend.

20140215_BlogMuesliBars-100While in the Bay Area I did a variety of events, from cooking classes to book signings and a little shindig at Anthropologie. And can I just say that I have loved meeting you all — those who I’ve gotten to meet — and talk with you about the recipes you’re making and about how you’re using the book at home? Writing a cookbook is a funny, solitary thing. For me, there was a lot of early morning or late night recipe testing and research, pacing, mad note-taking all over the house, and breakfast for lunch and dinner for months. It’s insular work and can be a bit (or a lot) lonely, so to get out of my kitchen and into the world with the book and share it with you all has been the highlight of the entire process for me.

20140215_BlogMuesliBars-101And I learned a little lesson while in San Francisco doing events. I had a policy of just saying “YES” to any book opportunity that came my way, but I got pretty tired last weekend moving from one to the next (sometimes with three in one day) with not enough time for a proper meal or a sit-down-and-chill-out-for-a-second. So I’ve started to look at my calendar more realistically now and am structuring my days in a more spacious way. Also: I have decided there must be more snacks. There were not enough snacks in San Francisco. In keeping that in mind, I whipped up these Citrus-Spiked Muesli Bars a few days ago and plan to take a batch on the road with me to Portland this weekend (Portlanders, I’d love to meet you! More information below).

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We are in love with these bars around here. They could really be called Lazy Man’s Granola Bars instead of muesli bars and Sam kept asking what makes them a muesli bar versus a granola bar — which is a really fair question. In truth, you could call them either. We’ve been making a new Triple-Grain Muesli for Marge Granola so I’ve been eating it non-stop lately and when I set out to make these, I wanted to throw them together quickly instead of measuring and weighing out a number of dry ingredients for them for you here. So calling for 3 cups of muesli is an easy way to say, essentially, you want to use 3 cups of your favorite rolled grains, nuts and seeds for these.

Muesli is a German word meaning “mixture” and I think that’s useful to keep in mind when thinking about mixing up your own batch. I created a Hazelnut Cherry Muesli a few years ago for The Kitchn, and last year wrote about a Fruit and Nut Muesli that we eat a lot (and that inspired the brand new Marge Muesli that just went on sale last week). Traditional bircher-style muesli is unbaked, but many people are toasting their muesli these days with a little bit of honey or sweetener and perhaps just a touch of oil or butter — or nothing at all. I have a Toasted Mango and Coconut Muesli in my cookbook that I love for it’s downright tropical nature and subtle kiss of sweetness — perfect for these gray winter days. But there’s a special place in my heart for clean, traditional unbaked muesli. It’s good morning energy food, and I love to soak mine in almond milk or runny yogurt for a few hours (or up to overnight) and doctor it up with a tiny bit of jam or honey. So the gist here: when it comes to muesli, do what makes you happy. Toast it or don’t. Add your favorite nuts and seeds. Maybe a few dried cranberries, cherries, blueberries or raisins. Put it in a pretty jar. It’ll make things good this week; I promise.

So really, the brunt of your dry ingredients for these bars is muesli. You can mix up your own batch or buy a bag at the store. Beyond that, I added sesame seeds and a few spoonfuls of millet for extra crunch. These are really optional (although delicious if they’re easy for you to get your hands on). The muesli in this recipe is lightly sweetened and bound with a mixture of dates, almond butter, maple syrup and orange juice — and a little orange zest and vanilla extract are folded in at the end. The citrus flavor is truly sunny in these — you’ll notice it right away but it’s not at all overpowering. It’s just enough to remind you that spring’s slowly, but surely, on its way.

I’ll be in Portland, OR this weekend to promote Whole-Grain Mornings. If you’re in the city (or close it it), I’d love to meet you! You can find me at the following spots (or learn more on the book website).

PORTLAND BOOK TOUR: THIS WEEKEND!
Saturday 2/22/14:
10-11:30 am – Pages to Plate, The Cakery at Baker and Spice (this event is a great deal! $20 includes the cost of the book, granola demo, snacks and coffee).

Saturday 2/22/14 : 3-5 p.m. – Book Signing + Granola Tasting at Anthropologie, Tigard Store (FREE; RSVP here!)

Sunday 2/23/14: 3-6 pm – Cooking class at Tabor Bread (I’m so excited about this class, a collaboration with Bee Local Honey, Strauss Creamery and the amazing folks at Tabor Bread. $30 includes cooking demo, snacks, samples, take home treats and a discussion on whole grain flours and local honey. Join us; $30!)

                                                                    *                                               *                                                 *

 

Citrus-Spiked Muesli Bars

Citrus-Spiked Muesli Bars

  • Yield: 9-12 bars, depending on size
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 25 mins
  • Inactive time: 1 hr
  • Total time: 1 hr 40 mins

Ingredients

1 tablespoon butter, for the pan
1 cup / 180g pitted dates (Medjool if you can find them)
1/3 cup / 80 ml maple syrup
1/3 cup /100g almond butter (or any nut butter you like)
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
3 cups / 230 g muesli (use gluten-free brand to make these bars gluten-free)
¼ cup / 30g sesame seeds, optional
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon kosher salt
3 tablespoons orange zest
3 tablespoons flax seeds or millet, optional

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 325 F. Lightly butter an 8-inch square baking pan and set aside.

Process dates in a food processor until they begin to gather together in a ball, about 1 minute.

In a small heavy-bottom pan on the stovetop, warm the maple syrup, almond butter and orange juice over medium heat. Whisk well so the almond butter fully incorporates into the maple mixture. Slowly pour into the bowl of the food processor, add the vanilla extract, and process for another minute or so, or until the dates loosen into the warm  maple mixture (should look like a really thick nut butter at this point).

In a medium bowl, whisk together your muesli, sesame seeds, cinnamon, and salt. Scrape date mixture into the bowl of muesli along with the orange zest and flax or millet and stir until all the grains and nuts are coated (while it gets a little messy, I use my hands at this point). Try to work relatively quickly so as not to let the mixture cool too much.

Turn the mixture out into the prepared pan and press firmly so it covers the surface evenly. I use the back of a spatula here to help.  Bake for 25-28 minutes (see note below), or until the edges of the bars are just turning slightly brown. Let cool for at least 30 minutes, and ideally 1 hour, to allow bars to fully set. Slice into bars the size of your choosing and serve room temperature. Cover and store leftovers at room temperature for up to one week.

A quick note on baking the bars: It can be difficult to tell when the bars are done. Don’t wait until they’re uniformly golden or dark brown on the top, or until they’re completely dry or firm to the touch. They will be perfect if they’re just turning lightly brown around the edges but should still give way to your touch in the center — much like cookies when they come out of the oven, the bars will firm up as they cool. Don’t be tempted to cut corners and slice them before they’re cool, however, or they won’t hold together well for you. Give them at least 30 minutes and preferably 1 hour to cool and set completely. Enjoy! 

Comments

  1. Melissa

    What a lovely muesli bra recipe. Will be bookmarking to make this for the weekend. Thanks for the recipe.

  2. Karen

    Hi Megan
    Just wanted to say that I bought a copy of your book and tried the morning glory oats recipe today and it is a revelation! Steel cut oats are not common here in Australia but i managed to find some to make a batch of the morning glory oats - wow! They are the closest thing to rice pudding that i have ever encountered in porridge! I am definitely a convert and keen to try lots more of your recipes...
    Ps on the muesli versus granola debate, i had always thought granola was an americanism for muesli as we never say granola regardless of whether the muesli is baked or unbaked...

  3. sara forte

    I remember this...when every moment seemed like you were living and breathing that dang book. And then it tickers off and you'll miss it in some nostalgic way and sign up to do it all again :) These look so great. I have recently feel in love with the seven sundays muesli but Im sure the new Marge stuff is fantastic! Good luck and big hugs to you in these next weeks, lovely.

  4. Amy P

    I made these today (with dried mango and coconut, which worked so well with the orange juice and zest) and they are awesome. Thanks for sharing a super snack and good luck with all of the events and taking a little time to breathe:)

  5. Susan

    I LOVE this book!!! Have made several things and they all look and taste good. Thank you so much. Enjoy your tour!

  6. wendy@chezchloe

    Hi Megan,
    I'm going to make these- I've been spending far too much $ on all those little organic snack bars and going blind trying to read the ingredient list on the labels.
    I just spent a fun weekend in Portland with my daughter. Darn missing you again! Great that you are getting to enjoy the fruits of your labor.

    I lived in Germany for three years- and ate a LOT of muesli. I make it regularly for my husband (unless I'm on some grain free kick).
    I found an in between I like using warm honey but no oils and I'll toast it slightly.
    Looking forward to April- cheers... wendy

  7. lori

    I am SO bummed that I missed you down here! Please let me know when you are coming back to SF and I'll host a signing for you in Napa. It was so exciting to see your book in the Piglet cookbook tournie. My fingers are crossed for you!

  8. Katie @ Whole Nourishment

    I am absolutely going to be making these bars. These seem perfect in the ingredient list and I like that they're baked. Some oat bars are not baked and I feel like raw oats that have not been soaked or cooked are too hard on our digestion. Thank you Megan, and so glad the book signings and meeting people have been such a highlight and inspiration!

  9. Lily (A Rhubarb Rhapsody)

    I am so desperate to make the citrus version, I love the idea of adding a citrus twist to classic granola bars. They sound perfect!

  10. autumn

    I have been wanting to brighten everything up with citrus lately! Here's to more snacks. Always!

  11. Caitlin @ teaspoon

    you've enlightened me! I recently moved to Switzerland and always wondered what the difference was between granola and muesli. Makes so much sense now. The Bircher-Muesli here is delish...lots of fruits, fresh and dried with yummy yogurt, oats, nuts, etc. If I was still in SF, I would have loved to go to your book signing! Sounds like it was a lot of fun. Enjoy your tour.

  12. Lizy Tish

    Just found your blog and book via The Smitten Kitchen. Love reading your posts - congratulations on your book ---- I'm off to purchase one as everything I've seen so far looks wonderful!

  13. Francesca

    This looks wonderful.. Ive been buying granola with my morning coffees, and didn't even think to make it at home.. this looks delicious!

  14. Kasey

    I keep re-reading this post and forgetting to comment. I am so bummed we missed you on your whirlwind trip, but so proud of you. I think you show know, I'm eating your homemade nutella (well, your recipe, my nutella), straight from the jar tonight. xo

    1. megang

      Thanks, Kasey! Yes, bummed we missed you too. That homemade nutella is my danger zone. I eat it right out of the jar, too. Kind of always, actually. Hope you're doing well my friend. Can't believe how big N is now! xox, Megan

  15. Denise

    Bummed that we missed the party, and that we missed you as well as Sam. From the sounds it it all went very well; which I knew it would! This recipe came at a perfect time as I am looking for heathy snacks to bring along to a big project in March. Nice rainy weekend, maybe I will even make a batch now!

    1. megang

      Bummed we missed you guys, too although SO HAPPY you got in a little vacation. Much needed, I know. Hope you guys had an amazing time -- the photos look incredible! xox, m

  16. Katie @ Whole Nourishment

    I made these oat bars last night and they are so delicious. Love how chewy and nutty they are. Thanks Megan for a wonderful snack idea!

    1. megang

      Awesome, Kate! So glad you're enjoying the recipe! Have a great weekend, Megan

  17. Amy P

    I just made these for the second time with dried mango and coconut in my museli mix, then I added a bit of dark chocolate to the nut butter/syrup and WOAH so super yummy.

    1. megang

      YEAH, Amy! Those sound killer! I've got to mix up another batch here soon. Happy sunday, ~m

  18. Kris

    This just solved all of my granola bar issues! I have tried a few other recipes and they are always too sweet, too crumbly, too heavy, too one-note. This recipe is great - chewy but not too dense or sweet and I now know citrus is the answer to everything else!

    I have 2 questions about them - do you imagine they'd still hold together if 1) you used banana instead of dates or 2) you left out the maple syrup completely to cut down the sugar?

    Thank yoU!

    1. megang

      Hi, Kris!
      So glad you enjoyed the recipe. So! I think the dates are key in a) adding some sweetness and b) binding them together; I don't think banana would have the same result. But I think you could very well cut out the maple syrup for a bar lower in sugar. Let me know how they turn out! Have a great week, ~Megan

  19. Kris

    Hi Megan. I finally made these again, using banana instead of date and cutting out the sweetener entirely. They held together all right but turned into a totally different recipe of course - they were drier and had a cakier, less chewy texture, more like a flour-based bar than a granola-based one. I would go back to dates next time but I think they would work w/o the maple syrup if dates were used.

    1. megang

      Thanks for the update, Kris. So wish I could've tried your version - they sound really interesting! Glad you're having fun experimenting with the recipe. Have a great rest of the week, ~Megan

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