A Winter Spice Cookie

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I know, I know. A cookie recipe on Christmas? I had lofty goals of doing a few whole-grain cookie recipes for you this season and then — the season really flew by, didn’t it? But if you’re anything like our family, there is a lot of down time together during this week and making (and eating) cookies is a nice break amidst wrapping and last minute errands. Plus, this cookie is decidedly wintery and could easily be bookmarked for a slow weekend in January or February instead — they’re warmly spiced; boast ground and candied ginger, a kiss of citrus, and a fragrant combination of both honey and molasses. If you’re an afternoon tea drinker, these have your name all over them. 

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I developed these 100% whole-grain cookies for Attune Foods; they’re made with whole-wheat flour, spelt flour, and honey graham crackers. We’ve made forays into spelt flour recipes on the site this year with Rhubarb Custard Crisp BarsButtery Almond Honey Cake, and Muscovado Fig Newtons — if you recall from any of those sweets, I especially love spelt flour for people looking to break into baking with whole-grain flours because it acts so much like all-purpose flour and is an easy substitute in most baking recipes; it’s what I call a great “starter flour.” The ground honey graham crackers help to lighten up and round out the flavor of these cookies, and add a bit of texture as well – making them delightfully tender and chewy at the same time.

We are in California now spending time with family (in the sun!), but I’m looking forward to joining you all back here in the New Year — planning a strong whole-grain breakfast line-up for January, including a book giveaway and all kinds of good, fresh morning ideas. As many of you know, Whole-Grain Mornings comes out December 31st (so soon!) — you can pre-order it now and it will arrive at your home just in time for some New Years inspiration. If you like the recipes and narrative around this space, I know that you’re going to dig the book. It has a good bit of each along with photos around our house and kitchen and the city we call home. Happy, happy holidays to you all! I’ve enjoyed a big ol’ 2013 with you here, and am so looking forward to the year ahead.

Learn More About the Book:
Whole-Grain Mornings

Spiced Ginger, Citrus and Graham Cookies

Spiced Ginger, Citrus and Graham Cookies

  • Yield: 12-14 cookies
  • Prep time: 20 mins
  • Cook time: 15 mins
  • Total time: 35 mins

Ingredients

1 cup (120g) whole wheat flour
1 cup (120g) spelt flour
7 whole Erewhon organic honey-graham crackers, broken into large pieces
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoons ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
3/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup (110g) brown sugar
1 cup (2 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
1/4 cup (60ml) blackstrap molasses
1/4 cup (60ml) organic honey
1 egg, room temperature
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 cup (85g) chopped crystallized ginger
1 tablespoon fresh orange zest

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper or a Silpat baking mat.

In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the graham crackers until they become fine crumbs (should yield about 1 cup)

In a large bowl, mix both flours, graham crackers crumbs, baking soda, baking powder, spices and salt together.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or using hand beaters), beat the sugar, butter, molasses and honey together for 1 minute. Add the egg and vanilla extract and beat well. Working slowly, add the dry ingredients and mix until just combined. Remove bowl from mixer and fold in the ginger and orange zest.

Divide the dough into 2-3 tablespoon sized balls and place on cookie sheet. Bake for 15 minutes, or until cookie tops become crackly. They will still feel a little soft to the touch, but will firm up as they cool. Cool for 5 minutes on the sheet then transfer to wire racks to cool completely.

Comments

    1. megang

      Hope you enjoy, Katrina! ~m

  1. Denise

    My friend, there is never a bad time to bake a cookie. Look forward to checking out this recipe, and to spending time here in your little nook of the world, in 2014.

    1. megang

      Miss you, D! Look forward to seeing you guys in 2014. xox

  2. Allison @ Clean Wellness

    I just purchased your cookbook and didn't realize you had this lovely food blog! I can't wait to snoop around and try some of your recipes on here. The cookbook is just beautiful. Congrats!

    Hope you have a wonderful new year!

Join the Discussion

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