Slowly, Fall

 

20130827_AttuneFigParfaits-102

Here’s the thing: working the farmers markets in the summer isn’t all that bad. There are sun-kissed peaches, warm breezes and happy customers. There are sunflower-toting toddlers, sweet tomatoes and wily dogs. But let’s say September hits and it starts raining in Seattle. Really raining. When this happens, there is a noticeable lack of peaches, warm breezes and happy customers — all replaced, instead, with soaking wet tents, soggy bags of granola, and zero shoppers It’s been that kind of a week. But thankfully, I’ve long had a big crush on fall and this year is proving to be no different. Despite the time I’ve had to work at the markets, the rain has actually been really nice. We bought some new bedroom furniture, I’ve been baking muffins and cooking fall soups, and FIGS. Hello, roasted figs. And hello, simple whole-grain breakfast parfaits. When I was a teacher, fall was all about fresh starts. There was a noticeable mark on the calendar for when school was back in session and I’d get a few new notebooks and a new sweater or two to mark the season. Today, the days aren’t as structured — August bleeds into September more fluidly and less noticeably without the new notebooks or sweaters. I miss the fresh crop of eager faces and the anticipation that comes from writing a new syllabus. I miss the wonderful health benefits and shorter work days. But there are things I don’t at all miss either: the hectic mornings with only time for a quick granola bar on the way out the door. These days, mornings can be a little slower. I can answer emails while making a real breakfast and sitting down to enjoy it instead of tackling it during the morning commute.

I worked on these fall parfaits for this month’s recipe over on Attune Foods, and I’m excited about it for a few reasons. First, if you haven’t yet tried their Rye and Hemp Cereal, you’re missing out: it combines rye, hemp and barley for a not-too-sweet and wonderfully toasty breakfast cereal (with 11 grams of fiber and 8 grams of protein!) Second, if you haven’t tried your hand at roasting figs, now is the perfect time. Roasting draws out the fig’s natural sweetness, making them even jammier (plus, it’s a great way to save any that are starting to soften / turn). You can roast the figs and toast the coconut the day before so when  busy mornings strike, you’re simply layering yogurt, cereal, and figs and sitting down to breakfast — no more time than it would take to pour a bowl of cold cereal, really.  So whatever mornings look like for you these days, I have a feeling these will gladly saddle right up to the table.

Honey-Roasted Fig, Almond and Toasted Coconut Parfaits

Honey-Roasted Fig, Almond and Toasted Coconut Parfaits

  • Yield: 4 servings
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 19 mins
  • Total time: 34 mins

Ingredients

8 washed and stemmed ripe fresh figs (about 220g)
1 tablespoon honey, plus more to top parfaits (optional)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 cup (480ml) plain yogurt
1/2 cup (35g) Uncle Sam Rye & Hemp cereal (or any bran flake cereal)
1/2 cup (60g) sliced almonds
1/2 cup (25g) unsweetened coconut flakes

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 400 F.

Slice figs in half and arrange cut side up on a medium rimmed baking sheet.

In a small bowl, whisk together the honey and olive oil. Drizzle over the tops of the figs, and roast for about 12 minutes, or until the figs are soft and the honey mixture is bubbling. Scoop figs onto a plate to cool.

Reduce oven temperature to 350F and toast the almonds and coconut until fragrant, about 5-7 minutes (feel free to use the same baking sheet although watch the coconut carefully to avoid burning).

To assemble: Select four of your favorite 8-ounce glasses or cups and scoop ¼ cup plain yogurt into the bottom. Layer on 2 fig halves and top with 1 tablespoon of toasted coconut, sliced almonds and Rye and Hemp Cereal. Repeat to create an additional parfait layer and add an additional drizzle of honey, if desired.  Serve immediately.

Comments

  1. Rachael

    FIGS! Oh how I've missed them!

  2. Katie @ Whole Nourishment

    Figs, honey, almonds, and coconut. What a perfect match!! And a lovely story as well, Megan. Figs usually don't make it to the oven in my house, but the rain and cool air is arriving here as well, so I think it's time to turn on the oven again. Thanks for a simple and delicious start to the day. :)

  3. Steph

    Yum!! I've been trying to decide what to make with figs this year, thanks for that!

  4. Nick

    I love this idea. I've been looking for new easy go-to breakfast ideas and this could be doable the night before and have it ready for the kids in the morning!

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