These August Days


Hello there, August. You have brought with you wonderful tomatoes which I’ve been eating almost daily, outdoor weddings, a new camera to play with, and sunny clear mornings. You’ve brought iced coffee with a touch of simple syrup, dinner with friends outside, and nights spent sharing a beer while watching the Olympics (those runners!).


You’ve brought picnics and big fava beans and juicy peaches. And so far, lots of time in the kitchen testing recipes and writing recipes, but little actually preparing real meals (thank goodness for Delancey pizza and late night burritos from El Chupacabra). You know that summer slump feeling when, although you’re surrounded by beautiful produce, you can’t quite think of what to cook? That’s where I’ve been lately. We’ve been eating lots of egg salad and tuna salad for lunch and simple grain salad concoctions for dinner. Little to no baking. Until just the other day when inspiration struck in the form of a cookbook.

In case you don’t already know, Sara and Hugh Forte, creators of the blog Sprouted Kitchen, have a cookbook coming out in a few weeks. It’s a true feast, visually and otherwise. I wrote to Sara the day after I received it in the mail to tell her I stayed up until 1 a.m. reading it and awoke thinking of all the recipes I was excited to make. Right up at the top are the buckwheat crepes with smoked salmon, creamy millet with roasted portobellos, and that coconut lime tart. And these cookies, of course, which I promptly made and we promptly ate most of the same afternoon.

On the blog and in the cookbook, Sara is the force behind the very do-able and delicious recipes (her salad recipes alone are worth a visit to the blog) and husband Hugh takes the photos. He approaches each dish with a unique angle and eye, resulting in some of the more innovative food photos I’ve seen in a long time. Thanks to both of them, you want to make dinner again. And breakfast. And lunch, too.

Which brings us to these cookies. They are the perfect little tea cookie — an afternoon treat or late night nibble much in the same vein as the sesame cookies we talked about a while back. Strewn with coconut, toasty cacao nibs, and little bits of fragrant almonds, they’re wonderfully nutty and naturally soft from the combination of coconut oil and almond meal. In the cookie world, these are keepers. You’ll get the sense before you even get them into the oven.

I should mention a few tweaks I made before getting to the recipe: I used a touch more salt than Sara does and ended up using demerara sugar instead of the muscovado she recommends. I’d recommend using any natural cane sugar you have on hand. If you don’t have any, it’s easy to find in the bulk aisle of a well-stocked grocery store and will make a difference flavor-wise here (you’ll notice a special chewiness from darker, natural sugars). I also decided to toss in some chopped toasted almonds at the last minute for a little extra crunch.

This afternoon, I’m hoping to break our usual Sunday farmers market routine and check out the Wednesday market instead. To stock up on a few things to cook for dinner tonight, thanks to Sara and Hugh.

Almond Meal Cookies with Coconut and Cacao Nibs

Almond Meal Cookies with Coconut and Cacao Nibs

  • Yield: 18 small cookies
  • Prep time: 20 mins
  • Cook time: 10 mins
  • Inactive time: 30 mins
  • Total time: 1 hr

Adapted from: Sprouted Kitchen 

Ingredients

1/2 cup sliced almonds
1 1/4 cups almond meal
1/4 cups cacao nibs
1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/3 cup natural cane sugar
1 egg
3 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375 F. Toast the sliced almonds until fragrant and golden brown, 5-7 minutes. Let cool, and then chop well.

In a large mixing bowl, stir together the almond meal, cacao nibs, chopped almonds, coconut, baking powder, salt and sugar.

In another bowl, beat the egg very well until it’s a uniform color and doubles in volume. Whisk in the coconut oil and vanilla extract. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix until just combined. Refrigerate bowl for at least 30 minutes and up to overnight.

Roll the chilled dough into 1″ balls using your hands. Place on baking sheet with 1 1/2-inches space between them, and give them a gentle press with the palm of your hand to flatten them slightly. Bake until edges just begin to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool before serving.

Comments

  1. Shanna

    Always glad to hear your voice, Meg. Thanks for sharing a window into your August... and Sara and Hugh's book! These cookies are going into my must-make pile ASAP.

  2. sara

    wow, thank you, sweet friend. So flattered. These are certainly a favorite. I want to try them with your changes! I always welcome a nutty crunch. I hear that you are growing a bit weary of food in this season of life, but you are doing a fabulous job and working hard. Cheers to you! Thanks again.

  3. Nicole

    I read my copy cover to cover when I received it, too. The cookbook is beautiful, and these cookies are on my list of recipes to make sooner rather than later. Your August sounds wonderful so far!

  4. Amanda @ Once Upon a Recipe

    I can relate to that summertime meal slump - I am experiencing it right now myself. Such beautiful ingredients to cook with, but no inspiration! However, I just checked out the Sprouted Kitchen blog and am so glad I did! Cheers to new inspiration - these cookies look lovely!

  5. Molly

    I'm so happy to hear good things about this cookbook. Looking forward to its release in just a few days.

    Oh man, August. I had a really good Tuesday, work-wise, but the highlight of my day was eating a tomato sandwich and a peach. Both needed to be done over the sink. Love this month. Love it. Love it.

  6. Anne Zimmerman

    I hear you, Megan! All this produce and I've got my sights set on a take-out, half-baked pie from the Arizmendi this evening. At least I'll use that CSA kale for a salad.

    The point is, I think, summer is short and we should enjoy it. Sometimes that actually means not cooking.

  7. molly

    Pity us poor souls who have to WAIT still, to get our hot little hands on a copy! Until then, thanks for tiding us over :)

    Also? I can't imagine any better way of eating, in August, in Seattle.

    Cheers,
    Molly

  8. Dana

    I have to wait until our move is complete to get that lovely book. I can't wait!

  9. Suzanne Perazzini

    Those cookies look like they come under the heading of healthy so they will get made on Sunday for our work-day morning teas.

    1. megang

      Suzanne-They are healthy, indeed, but don't taste it at all. I'm making another batch this morning to have around for the weekend!

  10. Anthea

    I'm going to comment since I never comment..but I have to admit that I became very disillustioned about Sara Forte's blog and her recipes after seeing recipe for what she called "Cranachan". I'm from Scotland and what is she called Cranachan isn't she called it on her blog. Cranachan is a traditional Scottish dessert and it isn't eaten for breakfast or a snack as she recommended and it definitely isn't a fruit compote mixed with yogurt and granola like mixture as she portrayed it. In Scotland everyone knows that Cranachan is the name of the dessert that contains fresh raspberries, thick cream, good quality whisky, roasted oatmeal, and honey - all of the foods that naturally occur in Scotland. I'm sure that her own mixture is delightful but perhaps she shouldn't use this term but something else. If she likes the word I wonder whether she could perhaps say her version is a riff of the the original since the original recipe has long history and it's simply scrumptious! Generations of people can attest to this!

    1. megang

      Sorry to hear about your frustrations, Anthea. I remember the recipe from Sara's site and remember how great I thought it looked. Now that you've told me about the traditional version (which sounds fantastic!) I'll keep my eye out for it when I finally get to travel to your neck of the woods. Thanks so much for your opinion. ~m

  11. Livebakelove

    these look so good, i will definitely need to give them a try.

    -livebakelove

  12. Megan

    I'm so glad to hear others are feeling the same way as me!! I've been feeling a little guilty with my lack of cooking over the past couple weeks. I've been relying on grains (like farro, etc) and just throwing stuff into it (like parsley, tomatoes from the garden, etc.). Secretly I'm waiting for cooler days/nights so I can start making a meatloaf and soup! haha Thanks for posting!

  13. kickpleat

    Happy summer!!! Your summer version looks lovely, as do these cookies. I loved the sesame ones so I'm sure these ones are just as nice.

  14. dervla @ The Curator

    beautiful, can't wait to get this book. It's been on my list for some time. Great review.

  15. Kris

    I'm looking forward to the arrival of my copy in about a week. In the meantime, I'm definitely going to make these cookies. Thanks for sharing!

  16. vicki archer

    those cookies look delicious...looking forward to trying out the recipe and getting the book... xv

  17. Sasha

    I cannot wait to make these cookies (oh summer cool down a bit so I won't be afraid of my oven) and I cannot wait to get a copy of this cookbook.

  18. Sarah

    Just made Sarah's original version. Absolutely delicious! I just ate three, but haven't finished my coffee yet and am staring down the rest. I think I could eat them all! Next time I'll definitely try it with the almonds and extra salt.

    Yup. I'm getting another one.

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