Tax Preparation Snacking

taxes and snacks
I failed geometry in high school. Literally failed. Had to take it over the next year. And I was a really good student so this was shocking (well really, I wasn’t all that shocked at all when it came right down to it). I doodled on my Converse in class and wrote moody poetry. Numbers have never been my thing. Words, yes. But not their more logical cousins. So it’s been a bit of an uphill struggle these past few weeks getting the financial statements and tax stuff all squared away for Marge. I’m slowly learning Quickbooks and have some nice people helping me out (thanks Mariane and Carol!) but it’s still a lot of accounting jargon. I feel like I need flash cards. Instead, I make snacks.

These are very simple little sweet toasts that are perfect for evenings when you’re stuck with your calculator dreaming of being somewhere else. They’ll take you there momentarily. Use your favorite crusty baguette and a good quality bittersweet chocolate (I like Scharffen Berger’s 72%). While I’ve been making these later in the evening with tea, I think they’d be darn fine in the morning, too.

Chocolate, Olive Oil and Sea Salt Toasts

Chocolate, Olive Oil and Sea Salt Toasts

  • Yield: 1 serving
  • Prep time: 5 mins
  • Cook time: 5 mins
  • Total time: 10 mins

This is one of those funny recipes that’s a little less a recipe than four ingredients that work magic together. I like to add a bit of Meyer lemon zest underneath the layer of bittersweet chocolate. Try it this way if you’re a lemon fan. Either way, simplicity rules here. The chocolate obviously melts so don’t obsess to much on getting perfect square of chocolate–I just chopped off uneven chunks.

Slightly adapted from: The Essential New York Times Cookbook

Ingredients

Four 1/4-inch thick baguette slices
Zest of one meyer lemon
4 thin 1-inch squares bittersweet chocolate
Extra virgin olive oil
Coarse sea salt

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Lay the bread slices on a baking sheet and sprinkle lemon zest on top. Lay a chocolate square on each and sprinkle with a little olive oil and sea salt.

Bake until the chocolate looks gooey and melted but not seeping all the way through the bread, about 5 minutes. The bread should be crisp. Out of the oven, sprinkle with a little more sea salt and a drizzle of olive oil.

Comments

  1. Mary

    I'm doing tax prep right now. Ahem, I'm really scrolling through tweets avoiding tax prep. Hang in there w/the bookkeeping - you'll master this too. ps. Made the salad from your last post - awesome.

  2. Evan

    I wish I had this recipe when I was going through my TurboTax.. it would have been a lovely addition :)

  3. Nicole

    I have always wanted my own business, but these are the things that give me nightmares.
    Good Luck.

  4. Angharad

    This reminds me very much of Dorie Greenspan's "Nutella Tartine" which I made the other week. Baguette+melted butter+ melted nutella+orange marmalade+salt+hazelnuts.

    Amazing!

  5. Anne Zimmerman

    I sent my taxes off to the tax man, but this still seems a perfect snack. Thanks.

  6. claire

    Ahhh, this looks delicious. I need this to get me through taxes!

  7. MICHELLE SCHOEPS

    OMG that looks so good!!! After my cleanse that's the first thing I'm eating! x

  8. Jill

    i got a D in geometry :/

    1. megang

      Jill! I never knew! And I can't believe the wealth of comments that have been coming my way lately from you :)

  9. Shaheen {The Purple Foodie}

    I have to get my bills together and get ready for filing my taxes (I have until June though). It's the worst part of being self employed. Worst!

  10. Dawn

    I like the way you think!! Maybe I'll bring these with me when it's time to meet with my accountant! ;)

  11. Lori

    I remember when Amanda first wrote about these toasts in the NY Times magazine. I was hooked and have dreamed of, consumed and loved them many times over. Thanks fore reminding me to make a batch today. Maybe for breakfast....

  12. Dana

    God forbid anything ever happens to Randy because I would be totally screwed on all things financial in our family. This post and your last one are making me realize I need to spend more time with that cookbook.

  13. Kasey

    I feel your pain. I took geometry in summer school - it wasn't fun. And I think I barely got above a C- in Algebra 2/Trig by doing a lot of 'extra credit' work. We all figure it out...day by day. :)

  14. Maddie

    Accounting, in my opinion, is never fun. But! When you start your own business, it must be kind of exciting to tackle the other, non-baking side of things. I imagine it would really bring home the fact that you're making your dreams into a day-job reality...which is amazing! (Especially with snacks like these to help you through Quickbooks training.)

  15. A Canadian Foodie

    Now who woulda thought? Nothing new about snacking during taxes... (or throwing oneself off of a bridge, for that matter) but this snack is absolutely novel. Chocolate, lemon, olive oil, salt and bread? Too bazaar to criticize. It begs to be tried!
    :)
    Valerie

  16. Emma

    hmmm yes numbers aren't my thing either, I loved English and languages at school but maths notsomuch .. and as for taxes!

    Love your chocolate spread! Especially with the sea salt, looks very lush :)

  17. Jen @ My Kitchen Addiction

    I should be working on my taxes right now, but I'm not! Perhaps I need to whip up a tasty snack like this to get me started.

  18. Rachael

    I made something similar the other night, with a bit of truffle oil and toasted sliced almonds. Pure heaven!

  19. Haley

    I just came across your blog, and I absolutely love it!

  20. hena tayeb

    This looks totally gross but sounds sooo good

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