What to Bake Thanksgiving Morning

Fresh Cranberry & Orange Scones
Well here we are: Thanksgiving week. I had a grand post planned for you today but I’ve come down with my annual ‘could you come at a worse time?’ cold, so it’ll have to wait. Instead, we have something relatively short but sweet and perfect for those of you looking for a quick breakfast treat to whip up on Thanksgiving morning. These scones are from the Flour cookbook. You’ve heard me go on and on about Flour so I’ll spare you today. But the book is genius. Put it on your Christmas list. Pronto.

cranberries

Now let’s talk scones. There are cream scone people and butter scone people. We can save ourselves a big debate at this very moment because I know you’ve got shopping to do, and I’ve got a suitcase to pack. And a camera to charge. And sunglasses to find. But let’s suffice it to say: cream scones tend to be softer and cakier (and usually a little flatter) while butter scones tread an interesting balance between hefty and flaky. They’re my absolute favorite, actually. Made with half butter and half buttermilk and creme fraiche, the cranberry orange scones I’m sharing with you today fall quietly and miraculously into both categories at the same time–the reason I’ve fallen so hard for them. They’re light and fluffy while still maintaining a nice exterior flakiness so characteristic of butter scones.

orange zest

I’m off to New York tomorrow at the crack of dawn; I’m wishing you a most amazing, restful Thanksgiving with your family, significant other, pets, gaggle of friends, wailing toddlers, rowdy neighbors, or whomever and wherever you find yourself sharing the day. Thank you for joining me in my tiny corner of the Internet. I’m grateful for that. And for you. Happy Thanksgiving.

A Few Other Morning Recipes from the Archives:
Vanilla-Specked Scottish Scones
Yeasted Waffles with Pomegranate Syrup
Pumpkin Semolina Cake (while not a breakfast recipe, this is a stunner at any time of day)
Blackberry Cornmeal Muffins (experiment w/ fruit, adding apples or pears instead of berries)
Winter Morning Couscous
Mexican Hot Chocolate

Fresh Cranberry and Orange Scones

Fresh Cranberry and Orange Scones

  • Yield: 8 scones
  • Prep time: 15 mins
  • Cook time: 20 mins
  • Total time: 35 mins

While you may certainly use dried cranberries (or any other dried or fresh fruit of your choosing), use fresh cranberries here if you can; there’s more genuine flavor and a little tartness that compliments the zest of the orange and the slight hand of sugar really nicely. In her directions, Joanne bakes up the scones in one large circle and then cuts them after they’ve cooled. I prefer cutting and separating them straight away so the edges get crisp just like the top.

Adapted from: Flour

Ingredients

2 3/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 1/2 cups fresh cranberries, chopped
2 tablespoons freshly grated orange zest (about 1 orange)
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted cold butter, cut into 8 to 10 pieces
1/2 cup cold buttermilk (feel free to use low-fat or non-fat buttermilk here if you'd like)
1/2 cup cold creme fraiche
1 cold egg
1 egg yolk, lightly beaten
2 tablespoons sanding sugar or granulated sugar, to top

Instructions

Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 F.

Using a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or a hand-held mixer), mix together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and sugar on low speed for 10 second until just combined. Add the orange zest and cranberries and mix another few seconds to combine.

Scatter the butter over the top of the mixed dry ingredients and beat on low for about 20-30 seconds, or until the butter is slightly broken down and nickel-sized pieces are still visible. In a separate small bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, creme fraiche, and whole egg until well mixed. On low speed, pour the buttermilk mixture into the flour-butter mixture and beat for 20-30 seconds, or just until the dough comes together. It’s o.k. if there’s a little loose flour at the bottom of the bowl.

Gather and turn it over in the bowl so that it picks up all the loose flour. Dump dough onto a clean counter top and pat it into an 8-inch circle about 1 inch thick. Brush the egg yolk over the top of the circle and sprinkle sanding sugar across the top. Cut the circle into 8 wedges and lay each wedge out onto a baking sheet.  Bake for 20-30  minutes or until they’re golden brown on the top and around the edges. Transfer to a wire rack to cool for 30 minutes. The scones taste best when eaten the same day, but are fine stored in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days.

Comments

  1. Danielle

    Scones are a relatively new addition to my repertoire, but I'm with you on the butter vs cream debate - there's nothing better for flakiness than butter.

    Safe travels and have a wonderful time with your family! I am so thankful for your friendship xo

  2. Kasey

    Sorry to hear you're sick, Megan! Hopefully some strong meds will pull you through and you enjoy NY! I am excited to check out Flour - these scones look faaabulous. Just because we gorge in the evening/afternoon, doesn't mean we can't start the morning with something deliciously carby (and sweet).

  3. Janae

    These look fantastic; perfect holiday flavors. Have a nice trip and feel better!

  4. Angharad

    These seem like an awesome Thanksgiving morning treat. What a way to start the day! I've already got a cranberry and maple loaf planned....but these look just gorgeous!

    Happy thanksgiving!

  5. Sanura

    A very good use of fresh cranberries... and they have plenty of Vitamin C to help fight your cold. Get well and continue eating healthy!

  6. Erin

    Thanks for another delicious post. I always enjoy your heartfelt writing and cozy recipes. Happy Thanksgiving!

  7. kickpleat

    I have cranberries on hand (our Thanksgiving was weeks ago), so I would love to do something with them. Looks delicious and perfect for breakfast.

  8. Sally

    Ooooo I LOVE cherry scones but adding zest, great tip thanks!

  9. Lisa Waldschmidt

    I had planned on making my favorite butter/buttermilk scones with currants and orange. I think I will try yours. Do you think I could substitute Chevre for the Creme Fraiche? I have a huge tub of it. Have fun in my time zone!

  10. Evan

    I love the flavor combo of these scones.. scones are my absolute favorite breakfast treat so I'll have to make these soon

  11. Jen @ My Kitchen Addiction

    That's the perfect thing to bake on Thanksgiving morning! I just might be whipping up a batch of these scones! Hope you're feeling better and have a lovely time in New York!

  12. Janet

    Oh, these look awesome. I've never made scones before - these will have to be my first. :)

    So sorry you're sick! I hope you feel better ASAP, and come home even sooner. I might die if I don't see you soon, and that's a fact.

  13. Megan

    No, thank you, Megan! I think one of your readers mentioned it's like getting a letter from you. It's such a joy to read your blog.

    Feel better soon so you can really enjoy New York. Happy Thanksgiving! btw: thanks for the tip about cutting and separating them straight away so the edges get crisp.

  14. Megan gordon

    Lisa- use sour cream instead. Chevre won't be same liquid %. xoxo

  15. tiina { sparkling ink }

    So lovely. Couldn't think of a recipe more perfect for Thanksgiving morning than this. Simply love it!

  16. Anna

    Well then, I will definitely be making these thanksgiving morning. Sounds perfect, thanks for the idea.

  17. TESOL Certification

    Thanksgiving or not, I will definitely bake this dish. Happy thanksgiving everyone!

  18. Malin

    I love scones either way, and these look absolutely delicious! Ideal breakfast!

  19. sirenjess

    Was your dough really sticky? Mine was and I was just wondering.

    1. megang

      Hi Jessica! Hmmm...no, it wasn't. I had a few friends make them over the holiday too and they turned out perfectly. I wonder: did you make sure that your butter, buttermilk and creme fraiche were super cold??

  20. Kelly

    Your picture, combined with the promise of a light, fluffy and flaky scone convinced me to try these. You've converted this non-scone eater! This recipe is delicious!

  21. Nicole

    I love cranberry scones and these look wonderful. I will have to check out the Flour book. Thanks for the tip! Hope this comments finds you felling better.

  22. Sue

    My dough was really wet and sticky, not like other scone recipes I've used. I also had to bake them a bit longer as they were extremely pale in color. They never got as nicely golden as yours. Any suggestions?

    1. megang

      Hi Sue-
      Did you make sure your wet ingredients were very, very cold? That's key. Then really the only reason those guys are so golden brown is the egg wash. Did you brush the tops with the egg wash?

  23. sara

    These look really delicious, and totally perfect for the holidays! :)

  24. Happy Thanksgiving! | Food: A Love Story

    [...] friend Shruthi’s Thanksgiving Pumpkin Pie Kheer for dessert and A Sweet Spoonful’s Cranberry Scones for breakfast tomorrow.  Oh yes, there is so much to be thankful [...]

  25. Aiden

    I made these last night and again for brunch today. Made creme fraiche myself and the scones I made this morning were much better because the creme fraiche had actually set. They were great. I'm not sure you really need an electric mixer, though. I think if you cut the butter up small enough, a fork and hands is enough to do the job quickly.

    1. megang

      Hi Aiden. So glad you enjoyed the scones. It's been a good year since I've made these myself and as I read over the recipe -- you may be right about the mixer. The one thing I love about scones is so often you don't need to lug it out. Thanks for the thoughtful comment; so glad you had a nice brunch. ~m

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