A Vision of Shanghai

The early morning view from our hotel

Hi from Shanghai!

I’m sitting here stealing a bit of Internet on the 32nd floor of our hotel all too early in the morning. The sun’s gleaming in through the curtains, horns are starting to honk below, and I’m clutching a steaming cup of strong coffee that Walter has so kindly prepared for me. Walter’s the dining room attendant and, for the lone souls who can’t seem to sleep much in Shanghai (I being one of them), he’ll make you one mean cup of coffee at sunrise. I have so much to share with you: photos & stories. The World Expo was really incredible, the food’s been amazing, the streets are lush with leafy trees and wide-open city parks. I’ve discovered dragon fruit and boiled peanuts, and learned that scooters and bicyclysits don’t adhere to traffic laws. We’ve finally figured out how to say common phrases like “thank you” properly and are logging some serious miles in our Converse.

The day awaits, my sisters are starting to stir, and my stomach’s becoming very aware that I’ve been up since 4 a.m., so I’ll leave you for now. But first, I wanted to check in and share a few photos–a quick visual tour. I can’t wait to tell you more.

Lychee fruit

Back patio of my favorite Shanghai shop, Urban Tribe

Breakfast, lunch, and dinner: dumplings!

Street vendors selling local cherries

Very clearly…my kind of town.

Comments

  1. Janet

    How cool! Love hearing about and seeing images from your trip. Can't wait for more! I'm impressed with your international blogging! :)

    Love the Converse shot - too cute!

  2. Denise | Chez Danisse

    Fresh lychee fruit! Excellent! You didn't feel well-prepared for the bicyclists not adhering to traffic laws? Really...

  3. El

    It looks your you're settling in quickly- already have a favorite store. Keep us posted!

  4. jennifer young

    you are so lucky to be in shanghai! i just got home from beijing! really wanted to go visit the expo...!
    j.

  5. Mary

    Fab photo tour, Megan! I want to eat some lychee now. Great to hear you're having a blast there. Dumplings for breakfast, lunch + dinner - sign me up. I'll bet the Chinese want your shoes...

  6. Mardi @eatlivetravelwrite

    Megan what an AWESOME post and such BEAUTIFUL pictures! I am speechless :-) Can't wait to read all about the rest of your trip!

  7. A Canadian Foodie

    Megan! I was with you at the window hearing the honking cars as the sun rose over that massive city and you await your new adventure. I have lost toenails on trips like that... so I understand the converse treads wearing thin. Thank you for the update... can not WAIT to hear more.
    :)
    Valerie

  8. Maddie

    Wow, thank you so much for sharing these beautiful pictures! I can't wait to hear more about your trip, but those images paint a fascinating picture of the journey. Keep them coming! :)

  9. Sanura

    Love the pictures of the lychee fruit and dumplings. I'm looking forward to seeing more photos and reading about your trip in Shanghai. Have fun!

  10. Midi

    Hi,I'm in Shanghai. Welcome~~If you need any helf,Please email me ~~Love your picture

  11. Kevin

    Nice post! Shanghai is a vibrant and exciting place. However, I don't think your photo is of lychees. Your pic is of wax berries (杨霉). Don't worry though, they both taste awesome!

    1. megang

      Thanks, Kevin. Wow, really?! They looked like lychees to me, but I trust you. This was the first time I'd tried them and I keep telling everyone how much I love lychee but maybe I'll change my tune now to wax berries...

  12. Kasey

    Looks so awesome, Megan! I can't wait to hear more. I was just talking with friends who told me that Shanghai may be the coolest city in the world--curious to see what your take is!

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